Forms & Policies » Student Handbook PreK-8

Student Handbook PreK-8

EVERETT PUBLIC SCHOOLS

121 VINE STREET, EVERETT, MASSACHUSETTS 02149

617-389-7950

 

JANICE GAUTHIER: SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS

 KEVIN J. SHAW: ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT

 CHARLES F. OBREMSKI: ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT FOR BUSINESS AFFAIRS and  PUPIL PERSONNEL SERVICES

 MICHELLE CROWELL: DIRECTOR OF CURRICULUM

 

 

A Message to Parents from the Superintendent of Schools

We believe that a child’s education is a cooperative undertaking between school and home.

Effective cooperation can take place on a sound base of adequate information. We need to know you, and you need to know the school system and its programs. Thus, in anticipation of the many questions that will occur to you relative to your child’s school life, we are happy to provide you with this handbook.

In the Student Handbook, we will introduce you to the educational programs, general practices and policies of the Everett Public Schools.

The administration, faculty and support staff of the Everett Public Schools are fully committed to providing quality education to the children of Everett.

 

Sincerely,

Janice M. Gauthier

Superintendent of Schools

The Everett Public Schools will provide a stimulating, integrated educational environment for the intellectual, cultural, social and physical growth of all children while fostering the necessary concepts, attitudes and skills for further growth. This environment will encourage each student to develop the needed skills and sensitivity for living effectively and responsibly. It is the Everett Public Schools’ responsibility, in cooperation with the community, to provide the best possible education for all children. The schools will offer the opportunity for decision-making, self-actualization and continued personal development while realizing that there are diverse capabilities in every human being. The local community will provide the necessary financial support and active participation in the educational process to ensure the desired results.

 

To support the Mission Statement, the Everett Public Schools will adhere to the following principles:

1. To accept all students for who they are.
2. To accommodate the varying learning styles and learning rates of all children.
3. To develop self-esteem in all students.
4. To respect cultural differences within the student population.
5. To educate all students to become lifelong learners.
6. To maintain high levels of expectations and to provide opportunities for all students to reach their maximum potential.
 
WAYS PARENTS CAN HELP
1. Your attitude toward school attendance sets the tone for your child's attitude. Be POSITIVE!
2. Regardless of your child's age, set a regular bedtime and/or curfew.
3. Allow plenty of time for getting ready in the morning.
4. Provide an alternate plan for getting your child to school on time.
5. Make every possible effort to schedule doctor, dentist and other appointments after school hours.
6. When you must schedule appointments during the school day, try to stagger them so that your child does not miss the same class every time.
7. If your child must be out of school for an appointment, make every effort to get him/her back to school for at least part of the school day.
8. Refuse to view tardiness as acceptable behavior.
9. Refuse to write excuses for anything other than a legitimate absence.
10. Discourage early dismissals.
11. Talk to your child about responsibility and the need to develop good work habits and positive attitudes now.
12. Plan family vacations in accordance with the school calendar.
13. If you know in advance that your child must be absent, notify his/her teacher(s) and make sure that your child understands his/her responsibility for making up work that is missed.
14. Do not send a child who is ill to school. Use good judgment.

 

* The term “parent,” as used in this Handbook, includes a student’s father, mother, legal guardian or person or agency legally authorized to act on behalf of the student in place of or in conjunction with the student’s father, mother or legal guardian.

A. Registration

Registration opens in May of each year for children who will be entering school for the first time. Notification appears in local newspapers and is sent home by notices with students.
• For Preschool, children must be three (3) or four (4) years of age before September 1st of the school year in which they will enter.

• For Kindergarten, children must be five (5) years of age before September 1st of the school year in which they will enter.

• Children who are six (6) years of age before September 1st of a school year, and who never have attended school, may enter Grade 1. Parents who wish to have their child begin Kindergarten at age six (6) should discuss their decision with the Principal.

• Registration is at the Parent Information Center located at City Hall, 484 Broadway, Room 2, Lower Level (entrance is on the Church Street side). Please call (617) 544-6955 to make an appointment to register your child. Registration must be done in person.

 

B. Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten Screening

Within the first week on entering Pre-Kindergarten, all students are screened. The following documents must be completed by the parent.
• Massachusetts School Health Record – to be completed by the child’s physician

• Health Questionnaire – to be completed by the parents

• Family Data Questionnaire – to be completed by the parents

• Three (3) Emergency Cards – to be completed by the parents

 

Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten screening is mandated by federal and state law. The screening is a general assessment of your child’s physical, social, emotional and intellectual development. It is not a readiness test or an evaluation. Its purpose is to gain as much information as possible to enable the school to identify those children who may need additional support in school and to meet those children’s needs. The Kindergarten teacher, guidance counselor, school nurse, and speech therapist will interview you and your child.

 

C. Pupil Placement

Class placement of elementary pupils is the sole responsibility of the Principal, after consultation with and input from appropriate staff members.

 

D. Open Enrollment Policy

Everett maintains an open enrollment system, whereby any parent may place his or her child in any school throughout the city as long as there are open seats available in the receiving school. In order to obtain a placement outside of your district, the following three conditions must be met:

• A written request must be made by the parent to the Principal of the receiving school, and the transfer must be approved by the Assistant Superintendent or the Superintendent of Schools.

• The receiving school must have room available for the child.

• The parent must assume full responsibility for transporting the child to and from school.

 

E. Chapter 74 Vocational Technical Education Program Policy

All 9th graders interested in exploring Chapter 74 Vocational Technical Programs will be afforded those opportunities at Everett High School.

The Complete EPS Wellness Policy Can Be Accessed HERE
Copies are also on file in the Superintendent's Office at 121 Vine Street and in the Principal's office of each school.
 

A. Immunizations

Preschool and Kindergarten: Massachusetts law requires that before a child may be admitted on the first school day of the year, a completed physical examination form and a completed and updated record of immunizations must be presented to the school.

 

To enter school, every child is required to have the following immunizations/screenings:

For Preschool

• 4 Diphtheria/Pertussis/Tetanus (DPT)

• 3 Polio

• 1 Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR)

• 1 Chicken pox (Varicella) or a physician-certified reliable history of chicken pox

• 3 Hepatitis B

• 1 Lead poison screening

• 1Tuberculosis screening or PPD test

• 3 Doses HIB Vaccine

• Physical

For Kindergarten

• 5 Diphtheria/Pertussis/Tetanus (DPT)

• 4 Polio

• 2 Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR)

• 2 Chicken pox (Varicella) or a physician-certified reliable history of chicken pox

• 3 Hepatitis B

• 1 TB Screen or PPD Test

• 1 Lead Poison Screening

• 4 Doses HIB Vaccine

• Physical

 

Kindergarten students also must have a certification of having passed a vision screening within twelve (12) months prior to entering school or within thirty (30) days after the start of the school year.

 

No child will be admitted to school without the required records.

 

Grades 1-8

Children in Grades 1 through 6 whose immunization schedule has been interrupted are required to have the following immunizations:

• 5 Diphtheria/Pertussis/Tetanus (DPT) or 3 Tetanus/Diphtheria (Td)

• 4 Polio

• 2 Measles/Mumps/Rubella (MMR)

• 3 Hepatitis B

• TB screening or PPD

• 2 Varicella

 

Such students may remain in school until the next dosage is due. Those who exceed the specified time interval become candidates for exclusion from school unless administration of immunization is scheduled within fifteen (15) school days.

 

Children entering Grade 7 must have proof on the first day of school that they have had the following immunizations:

• Tetanus/Diphtheria booster or Tetanus/Diphtheria/Pertussis (Tdap)

• Chicken pox (Varicella) or a physician-certified reliable history of chicken pox

 

B. Communicable Diseases

If a child contracts a communicable disease, that child will be sent home from school. Once the child is well, he/she must present a doctor’s certificate for readmission to school. A parent or a person designated by the parent always is notified before a child is dismissed.

 

C. Health Services

Hearing and vision testing will be conducted yearly to meet Massachusetts Department of Public Health guidelines. Postural screening is done in Grades 5-9. Children are also weighed and measured in Grades 1, 4, 7 and 10 according to the Department of Public Health regulations. If a child should not meet the guidelines set up by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, a form will be mailed home to the child’s parent.

 

Physical examinations are required of all students entering Pre-School, Kindergarten and students who are new to the district. This exam must be conducted by the child’s doctor. Physical examinations also are required in Grade 4 and Grade 8. Parents then have the option of submitting an examination report from their family doctor.

 

D. Health Centers

Anna May Powers Health Center at Keverian School. 20 Nichols Street, Everett, MA 02149.

Telephone: (617) 575-5660

This school-based health center currently offers the following mental health and counseling services for children and adolescents:

• Comprehensive psychiatric services

• Medication management by a child and adolescent psychiatrist

• Counseling services with a licensed social worker

 

Everett Teen Health Center at Everett High School, 100 Elm Street, Everett, MA 02149.
Telephone: (617) 843-0700

The Everett Teen Health Center is one of four school-based health centers operated by Cambridge Health Alliance. Health Services at Everett Teen Health Center are provided by expert clinicians and include the following: Teen-friendly primary care

• Reproductive care

• Health education

• Mental health care and counseling services

 

The Teen Health Center is closed during the following school vacations:

• Thanksgiving Day and the Friday after Thanksgiving Day

• Christmas through New Year’s week

• February and April school vacation weeks

 

When the Health Center is closed, telephone calls made to the Center will be forwarded to the CHA Revere Family Health Center, which will provide assistance with health care needs.

 

E. Policy for the Dispensing of Medications

• The Everett Public Schools are and will continue to be in full compliance with Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 71, Section 54B and Department of Public Health regulations governing the administration of medications, including psychotropic medications, in school settings.

Except as specifically allowed by law and in accordance with applicable regulations relating to students with asthma or other respiratory diseases, life-threatening allergies, cystic fibrosis or diabetes, prescription and nonprescription drugs must be administered by the school nurse or his/her designee.

All medications will be housed in the school nurse’s office, except that EpiPens may be housed in alternative sites within the school. Parents must deliver medications directly to the school nurse. Medications must be in pharmacy-labeled bottles. (Ask the pharmacist for an additional labeled container for school medications.

• Medication administration should be requested only if the medication schedule will not allow for home administration. For example, most antibiotics are on schedules that allow for home administration.

• Medical forms may be found at the end of the Student Handbook.

 

F. District Wellness Policy

The Everett Public Schools is committed to providing a school environment that enhances awareness and learning of lifelong wellness.

Through the following Wellness Committee goals, the school district will provide developmentally appropriate nutrition and physical education by:

• Providing child nutrition programs that comply with federal, state and local requirements

• Ensuring that child nutrition programs are accessible to all children

• Promoting and providing interdisciplinary nutrition education

• Ensuring that meaningful physical activity connects to students’ lives

• Providing and promoting school-based activities that are consistent with local wellness policy goals

• Ensuring that foods and beverages made available on campuses are consistent with current Dietary Guidelines for Americans

• Ensuring that foods made available on campuses adhere to food safety regulations

• Providing school environments that are safe, comfortable and pleasing and that allow ample time for eating meals

• Ensuring that food and physical activity are not used as a reward or punishment

A. Personal Hygiene Plan

• All parents/guardians are required to maintain a complete, clean change of labeled clothing at the school.
• Teachers will periodically ask children if they need to use the toilet facilities. Teachers will assist the children in use of these facilities, in managing clothing and in encouraging good hygiene.
• In the event of a toileting accident, a member of the child's teaching team will assist the child in bathing and changing of clothing. Soiled clothing is placed in a double bag and returned home with the child. Parents should send in a clean change of clothes on the next school day.
• Staff and students will wash their hands thoroughly after using the bathroom facilities.
• Children placed in the preschool program must be toilet trained upon entry into the program.
• Children with special needs, as identified in their Individualized educational Plan, may be placed in the classroom without being toilet trained if, as a result of their disability, they require diapering and changing as part of their individual program.

 

B. What Your Child Will Need to Bring to School

Unless otherwise directed, please send your child with a nutritious snack, napkin and drink daily. A smock for art activities is also necessary. An old tee-shirt or a short-sleeved men's shirt should serve the purpose well. Please check your child's cubby periodically to determine if the smock needs to go home for laundering. Please be sure to return it on the next school day. Each child will also need a complete change of clothing.

 

C. Health

Since providing sound medical health services in children’s early years has an impact on them for the rest of their lives, providing for your child's health needs is a significant responsibility and commitment. If you require or request community services, we will be available to direct you accordingly.

Your child must have had appropriate immunizations and a lead poisoning screening before he or she may enter preschool or Kindergarten. For specific information regarding immunizations, please refer to the Health Programs section of this Handbook or contact the Board of Health at 617-394-2314.

 

D. General Health and Safety Rules

• Shoes and socks must be worn to school.

• Please put band-aids on open cuts or wounds.

• If your child appears to be sick in any way, i.e., elevated temperature, diarrhea, cold symptoms, cough, etc., please keep him/her home.

• Please be sure that there is someone who can be reached at home or that there is a working phone number on the emergency card where we may reach you in case your child becomes ill during school hours.

• Please send nutritional snacks/lunch with your child. Your child's teacher is available to assist you. You will find examples of nutritional snacks in our brochures, the public library and the school nurse’s office.

 

E. Arrival and Departure
We gratefully appreciate your cooperation with our Arrival and Dismissal Policy. All parents are expected to be prompt at arrival and dismissal times. Failure to pick up your child promptly will result in police notification. Failure to comply with our policy may result in your child’s exclusion from the program.

 In order to ensure the safety of each child, children will be sent home only with their parents, or an adult designated by the parents. We are unable to release your child to anyone whom you have not specifically designated. It is extremely important that you do not send an unfamiliar adult to pick up your child without informing us first. Positive identification will be required. Photo identification will be requested and kept on file.

 

F. Preschool Attendance

If a preschool child is absent on ten (10) occasions, the child’s parents will be asked to attend a conference. If a preschool child is absent more than twenty (20) days in a school year, the child may be withdrawn from the program, and the parents will be notified of the child’s withdrawal in writing. The Principal of the preschool program may dismiss any child who is habitually tardy or absent from school.

 

G. Emergencies
In the event that your child should become ill or hurt during the school day, we will call you at the telephone numbers listed on the child’s emergency cards. Because sick children feel better when they receive immediate attention from their parent, it is important that we be able to reach you as soon as possible. Therefore, please be sure that the telephone numbers you provide are current, and notify us at once should any changes occur in your address(es) or the people we should notify.

 If it is judged that your child needs to be taken to a hospital, an ambulance will be called. Every effort will be made to contact you immediately. However, if that is not possible (e.g., children are at the park or a similar setting where there is no phone), you will be called as soon as your child arrives at the hospital.

A. School Hours
Kindergarten through Grade 8: 7:45 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
Students are to enter the school building at 7:45 a.m.
Students are marked tardy after 8:00 a.m.

Normal dismissal time for all students is at 2:30 p.m.; however, students may be detained after the close of school until 3:30 p.m. to make up lessons.

 

B. Daily Admittance To and Dismissal from School

In order to maintain safety, students are not allowed to enter the schools before 7:30 a.m. Before that time, teachers are engaged in classroom preparation activities and are not available for playground supervision.

Parents must instruct their child to go directly home at dismissal time or to another prearranged location.

Children are not allowed to re-enter the school building without permission once they have been dismissed.

 

C. Breakfast and Lunch Program

• The Everett Public Schools provides mandated breakfasts and lunches for students in Grades PK-8.

• Meal Benefits are determined according to federal guidelines.

• Notification will be given regarding the cost of lunch and milk.

• Monthly lunch menus are published in advance, distributed to students and posted in classrooms.

• Parents will be notified in advance if breakfast or lunch is not going to be served on a particular day.

 

D. Noon Dismissal and Early Release Days

Students will be dismissed at 12:00 noon during the entire first week of school, on the Wednesday before Thanksgiving and on the last day of school. On noon dismissal days no lunch will be served.

 

Parents are notified in advance of “early release days.” Those whose children attend afternoon private day care programs should notify their day care provider of “early release days.”

 

E. Emergency Dismissals

On infrequent occasions it may be necessary to dismiss students before the regular dismissal time due to rapidly deteriorating weather conditions or other emergencies (no heat, water leak, etc.). Parents/ guardians are advised to make arrangements for their children at the start of the school year, in the event that school must be closed early due to an emergency.

 

F. School Cancellations

Schools will be in session except in the event of inclement weather or other emergency conditions. The Everett Public Schools does NOT have early release or delayed starts, except in the case of emergency situations. Television stations will provide school cancellation announcements on Channels 4, 5, 7 and the FOX network.

 

All schools use a “Reverse 911” computerized telephone messaging system to notify parents of school cancellations. Therefore, it is imperative that a current telephone number is on file in the Principal’s office.

 

Please do not telephone local officials, including the police, fire department or schools regarding “no school” announcements. It is important for these telephone lines to be available for emergency situations.

 

G. Days on Which School Is Not in Session

Schools are not in session on the following days:

• Every Saturday and Sunday

• The afternoons of each day during the first week of school; there will be a noon dismissal on each of those days

• Labor Day

• Columbus Day

• Professional development days in September and November

• Veterans’ Day

• The Wednesday prior to Thanksgiving Day will be a noon dismissal day; schools will be closed on Thanksgiving Day and the Friday immediately following Thanksgiving DayThe week during which the winter holiday break is celebrated

• New Year’s Day

• Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

• The week during which Presidents’ Day is celebrated in February

• The week during which Patriots’ Day is celebrated in April

• Good Friday

• Memorial Day

• The last of school will be a noon dismissal

• The summer recess

 

When any of the single days listed above occurs on a Sunday, school will not be in session on the following Monday. In addition to these “no school days,” the Chairman of the School Committee may instruct the Superintendent to dismiss all schools on extraordinary occasions of general interest.

The main office at each school is the Lost and Found center for the school.

A. Emergency Cards
It is vitally important in times of emergency that we are in possession of information that will enable us to contact parents immediately and directly. For this reason, we ask all parents each year to complete three (3) emergency cards at the beginning of the school year. These cards are sent home with all pupils, and should be completed in full and returned immediately to the school. The card provides the school with telephone numbers and addresses where a parent, relative or close family friend can be reached. Any change in a telephone number, home address, or place of employment should be reported to the school at once.
 
B. Withdrawal-Transfer Procedures
If a family moves during the school year, the parent must come to the school to sign a records release form. The school provides the parent with a transfer card, containing appropriate information that the new school will need. This transfer card includes a record of the student’s immunizations. The new school must request records directly from the old school before a student’s records will be mailed out. Once the new school requests the records, the old school will send the records without requiring consent from the parents. Student records are not given to the parent to take to the new school. If the records release form is not signed before moving, the student's records will be forwarded to the new school upon the written request of the receiving school.
 

C. Student Records

Access of Staff, Custodial Parent and Eligible Student to Student Records. Student records are stored in the schools and are utilized and updated by authorized school officials who work with or provide services for the child (administrators, teachers, guidance counselors, specialists, etc.). An authorized school official has the right to have access to student records, if he/she needs to do so in order to fulfill his/her professional responsibilities.

 

A parent and an eligible student (fourteen (14) years of age or older) have the right to inspect the student’s records upon request. Such requests should be submitted in writing to the Principal. The records must be made available within ten (10) days of the initial request, unless the parent or eligible student consents to a delay. The parent and eligible student have the right to receive a copy of any of the student records; however, the school has the right to charge a reasonable fee for the cost of duplicating the materials. The parent and eligible student may ask the Principal to have parts of the records (for example, test scores and other evaluative data) interpreted by a qualified professional from the school or may invite another person of their choice to accompany them to review and interpret the records.

 

Access of Non-Custodial Parent: A non-custodial parent is eligible to obtain access to the student records of his/her child, unless:
• The parent has been denied legal custody or has been ordered to supervised visitation, based on a threat to the safety of the student and the threat is specifically noted in the order pertaining to custody or supervised visitation, or
• The parent has been denied visitation, or
• The parent's access to the student has been restricted by a temporary or permanent protective order, unless the protective order (or any subsequent order modifying the protective order) specifically allows access to the information contained in the student record, or
• There is an order of a probate and family court judge which prohibits the distribution of student records to the parent.

 

In order to obtain access to student records, the non-custodial parent must submit a written request for the student record to the Principal. When the Principal receives such a request, the school will notify the custodial parent immediately by certified and first class mail, in English and in the primary language of the custodial parent. The Principal will inform the custodial parent that the school will provide the non-custodial parent with access to the student records after twenty-one (21) days, unless the custodial parent provides the Principal with documentation that the non-custodial parent is not eligible to obtain access for one of the reasons stated above.

 

When the school provides a non-custodial parent with student records, it will delete all electronic and postal address and telephone number information relating to either work or home locations of the custodial parent, as required by law. In addition, such records must be marked to indicate that they may not be used to enroll the student in another school. Upon receipt of a court order that prohibits the distribution of student record information to a non-custodial parent, the school will notify the non-custodial parent and will cease to provide him/her with access to the student records.

 

Amendment of the Student Record. A parent or eligible student has the right to add information, comments, data, or any other relevant written material to the student record. A parent or eligible student also may request in writing that information in the student record by deleted or amended, except that information that was inserted by the student’s Evaluation Team will not be subject to such a request until after the Evaluation Team Educational Plan has been accepted, or, if rejected, the special education appeal process has been completed.

 

Any deletion or amendment of the student record shall be made in accordance with the procedure described below:

• If the parent or student is of the opinion that adding information is not sufficient to explain, clarify or correct objectionable material, the parent or student shall present the objection in writing and/or in a conference with the Principal or his/her designee.

• The Principal or his/her designee shall provide the parent or eligible student with a written decision, including a statement of the reasons for the decision, within one week after the conference or receipt of the objection, if no conference was requested. If the Principal’s decision is in favor of the parent or student, the decision shall be promptly implemented.

 

Release of Directory Information. The school may release some or all of the following directory information regarding students during the course of the school year: a student's name, address, major field of study, dates of attendance, weight and height, if a member of an athletic team, class, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, degrees, honors and awards, and post high school plans. If a parent or eligible student does not wish to have this information released, the parent or eligible student must so notify the Principal.

Destruction of Student’s Temporary Record. Student records are comprised of the student’s permanent record (transcript) and the student’s temporary record (all other records, including, for example, documents relating to the student’s registration, attendance, discipline, standardized test scores and special education IEPs and assessments). A student's transcript is kept by the school district for at least sixty (60) years following his/her graduation, transfer or withdrawal from the school system.

 

A student’s temporary record will be destroyed by the school district within five (5) years after the student transfers, graduates or withdraws from the school system, provided that a parent or eligible student may receive a copy of any of the information in the student’s temporary file before it is destroyed. School authorities also may destroy misleading, outdated or irrelevant information in the student’s record from time to time, while the student is enrolled in the school system. In either case, the school will provide written notice to the parent or eligible student prior to the destruction of the student’s records, to give them an opportunity to obtain a copy of the records.

Further information regarding the Massachusetts Student Records regulations, 603 CMR 23.00, et seq., and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is available in each school’s Guidance office.

A. School Visitors
The Classroom Visitation Policy is on file in the Superintendent's Office at 121 Vine Street and in the Principal's office of each school.
 
The safety of the children is of the utmost importance. School doors are kept locked at all times; therefore, all visitors with any legitimate reason for visiting the school must ring the door bell at the main entrance. After entering, the visitor then should go directly to the Principal's office where he/she should state the reason for visiting. To preserve the safety and security of our students and staff, we respectfully request that all visitors remove their hats, hoods, and sunglasses while in school buildings and turn off their cell phones while in the school. The Principal or his/her designee has the authority to determine whether a visitor is permitted in the school.
 
B.  Communication Procedures
• Communication between home and school is encouraged and should be open at all times. Teachers and Principals are always happy to meet with parents to discuss concerns or pupil progress.
• Teacher-parent conference nights are held three (3) times per year.
• Parents who wish to make immediate visits with teachers should call the Principal's office or send a note requesting an appointment. Teachers cannot interrupt their classrooms to talk on the telephone; but they will return a call as soon as possible.
• Parents can also communicate with teachers via email using the teacher’s work email address.
• Appointments with teachers should be made before or after school in order not to disrupt the classroom routine.
A. Curriculum Areas
The Everett Public Schools provides instruction in the following curriculum areas: English Language Arts, Health, Mathematics, Physical Education, Social Studies, Art, Science, Technology, Music (Options in Grades 5-8), Computer

B. Curriculum Development
While curriculum is generally understood to be "the subject matter to be taught," it is more than this. Curriculum is composed of an educational philosophy, a subject area philosophy, goals, objectives, instructional approaches and materials needed to bring about desired changes in pupils' skills, knowledge and attitudes.

 
The Everett Public Schools' curriculum reflects the three objectives of the Massachusetts Education Reform Act of 1993: instructional strategies that meet the academic needs of students, uniformity of integrated curricula and teacher and pupil assessment of learning. The Common Core State Standards provides the strands and learning standards for the content taught in all schools through the integration of all subject areas.

 

Thus, the common core provides guidelines to ensure a coherent plan for the ongoing assessment, development, implementation and evaluation of the curriculum. This plan is a statement of commitment by the faculty of the Everett Public Schools to continue to provide quality education to the children of Everett.

Remedial Services: The classroom teacher refers students to remediation programs after each child’s needs have been identified through assessment and diagnostic testing. Title I supplements the citywide program by providing federal funds to increase the remedial services in Reading and Mathematics. Federal guidelines are strictly followed for qualifying schools and students. The Title I Handbook is available in the Superintendent’s office at 121 Vine Street. For more information, click HERE
Guidance Department: Guidance services are provided for students in need in all schools. The department also administers the state-mandated assessment testing. 
Audio Visual Department: This department includes individual school libraries and houses a large collection of software, which complements all curriculum areas.
Music Department’s Instrumental Program: Instrumental lessons are provided to students in Grades 5-8. Any student who has his or her own instrument is welcome to participate. The Music Department holds an instrumental demonstration and a meeting for parents who wish to rent instructions for their children in September.
Special Education Classes: In accordance with federal and state law, the school district provides special education services to students who have been identified as having a disability and who require specialized instruction in order to access the curriculum. The Special Education Department provides an array of services for special education students. The school district has established classes for students who cannot function adequately within a regular classroom, and provides services within the regular classroom for students who can function there with the help of a moderate special needs teacher or other special education staff member(s).
 
Parents who feel that their child is in need of more than the regular remedial services should consult with the Principal and/or classroom teacher before a referral is made to the Special Education Department.
 
All qualified elementary and secondary public school students who meet the definition of an individual with a disability under Section 504 are entitled to receive regular or special education and related aids and services that are designed to meet their individual educational needs as adequately as the needs of students without disabilities are met.   Section 504 also requires, among other things, that a student with a disability receive an equal opportunity to participate in athletics and extracurricular activities, and to be free from bullying and harassment based on disability. Parents who feel that their child is in need of a 504 Plan should consult with the Principal or guidance counselor to make a referral for a 504 evaluation.
 
A. English Learner (EL) Program
In accordance with federal and state law, the English Learner (EL) Program is responsible for identifying students who are not proficient in the English language and for providing those students with English language instruction to develop proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening in English.
 
Incoming students are screened, using a Home Language Survey in the family's primary language.  If a language other than English is reported on the Home Language Survey, an assessment (WIDA Screener for grades 1-12, W-APT for Kindergarten, and Pre-Las for Pre-K) is given to determine the student’s English language proficiency level. Students whose test results are under the proficiency thresholds determines by the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education are identified as English Learners (EL).  ELs are placed in Sheltered English Instruction (SEI) classrooms, where they receive sheltered content instruction in English.  SEI is defined as an English language acquisition method for children where curriculum and presentation are designed to develop academic content alongside English development.  Books and instructional materials are in English, and all reading, writing and other subjects are taught in English.
 
Families of ELs may opt-in to SEI programs that include explicit English as a Second Language instruction using a curriculum based on the WIDA ELD standards and instruction tailored to students’ proficiency levels and delivered  by a licensed English as a Second Language teacher.  These SEI programs are available at the Parlin School grades 1-8, the Lafayette School grades 1-5, the Whittier School grades 1-6.
 
Families of ELs may opt-out of SEI Programs with ESL instruction.  The district documents the family's decision and creates a schedule for the EL that does not include direct ESL instruction.  The student will continue to be classified as an EL and must participate in the ACCESS English Language Proficiency assessment annually until he or she meets the criteria to exit the designation of English Learner.  All ELs in the district will be provided equitable access to the curriculum.
 
English Learners who obtain English proficiency and who meet the state's criteria to exit English Learner status will be classified as Former Limited English Proficient (FLEP).  Their progress will be monitored for four (4) years thereafter.  Students who are struggling after becoming FLEP can be reclassified as English Learners after thorough review by the student's teachers. 
 
Under certain circumstances, parents may request a waiver to have the student transferred to a bilingual program, such as a two-way bilingual program or another generally recognized educational methodology permitted by law. A parent seeking a waiver for a student must apply annually by visiting the student’s school and providing written informed consent for the waiver.
• For students under the age of 10, waivers are allowed in the following circumstances: (a) the student has been placed in an English language classroom for at least thirty (30) school days prior to the submission of the waiver application; (b) school officials have documented in writing that the student has special and individual physical or psychological needs, separate from the lack of English proficiency, that require an alternative course of study, and such documentation is included in the student's permanent school record; and (c) the Principal and the Superintendent have indicated their approval of the request by signing the waiver application.

For students age 10 and older, waivers are allowed when it is the informed belief of the Principal and educational staff that an alternative course of study would be better for the student's overall educational progress and rapid acquisition of English.

A. Grade Reporting
Report cards are issued to students in Grades Pre-Kindergarten and Kindergarten in January and June.  Students in Grades 1 through 8 receive report cards in November, January, April, and June.
 
When reports cards are issued, they are sent home for parental review. Parents must sign their name on the report card envelope and have the student return the envelope to his or her homeroom teacher. The parent’s signature does not mean that the parent approves of the marks, but merely is evidence that the parent viewed the report card

Supplementary reports are issued mid-way through each quarter. With the approval of the Principal, a teacher may send a supplementary report at other times. Parents are encouraged to contact their child’s teacher immediately, when a supplementary report is issued. The issuance of a supplementary report usually is an indication that the child is having some difficulty and a meeting with the teacher could help correct the problem.
 
B. Grading System for Academics
Report cards are based on student performance and teacher observation. They indicate the student’s standing from the beginning of the reporting period to the end of the reporting period. Marks are not cumulative. Each reporting period is independent of the previous period. The final grade is the average of the grades reported in each reporting period on the report card. All subjects graded are based on the Massachusetts Common Core.
 
Students receive letter grades in English/Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. They receive a grade of Pass or Fail in Art, Computer, Health, Library, Music and Physical Education, which are marked by the specialists.

 

C. Incomplete Grades

When a student receives an incomplete grade due to absences, the student will have up to fifteen (15) school days to make up the work, or the grade will become an F.

 

D. Letter Grades/Averages, Grades 3-8
A+ 9-100
A 93-96
A- 90-92
B+ 87-89
B 83-86
B- 80-82
C+ 77-79
C 73-76
C- 70-72
D+ 67-69
D 63-66
D- 60-62
F Failure
FA Failure due to absences
INC Incomplete


E. High Honor, Honor, and Credit- Grades 6-8

Outstanding achievement recognition is based on grades in the following subjects: Mathematics, English language Arts, History, and Science. High Honors: All A’s in every subject; Honors: More A’s or an equal number of A’s and B’s; Credit: Any combination of A’s and B’s with no more than one C. All students must achieve a passing grade (P) in all other subjects.

A. Preschool and Kindergarten
The program in Preschool and Kindergarten is based upon readiness to prepare students for the next grade. Preschool and Kindergarten teachers are the best judges of the readiness of each student to master the next grade’s curriculum. Although parents have the right to place their children in the next grade at the appropriate age, in accordance with the school district’s enrollment policies, emphasis should be placed on the teacher’s recommendations.
 
Students who are in need of more readiness work at the end of one complete year, or students who have not completed a full year, may repeat that grade with the approval of their parent and upon recommendation from the school. Parents will be made aware of their right to place the student and shall be asked to sign the agreement form.
 
B. Grades PK-2, Standards-Based Report Cards
The change to Standards-Based Report cards comes from our belief that our previous report card at these grade levels did not fully communicate what students are expected to know and be able to do as set forth by Massachusetts Curriculum Frameworks. The format of the report card allows us to define standards for each grade and determine how well students are progressing in meeting the standards.
 
Student progress will be reported as:
Needs More Practice (1): The student is not making progress towards the standard.
Progressing (2): The student is progressing satisfactorily in their progress towards the standard with assistance of the teacher.
Meeting (3): The level of progress that the student is making is well-developed and the student is producing quality work.
Exceeding (4): The student is progressing at an exceptional level and is producing high-quality work, consistently in regard to the standard.
 
C. Grade 3
Promotion is based on the student’s composite score in English/Language Arts and Mathematics. To be promoted, a student must have the necessary Reading and Math skills at the end of the school year to succeed at the next grade level.
 
D. Grades 4, 5 and 6
Promotion is based on the number of major subjects passed. The four major subjects are English/ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. To be promoted, a student must pass at least three major subjects, one of which must be English/Language Arts or Mathematics.
 
E. Grades 7 and 8
Promotion is based on the number of major subjects passed. The four major subjects are English/ Language Arts, Mathematics, Social Studies and Science. To be promoted, a student must pass three major subjects.
 
Subject to the approval of the Principal, a student in Grade 7 or 8 who fails a major subject may be allowed make up the failed course by attending summer school, as long as the summer school meets the standard number of summer school hours adopted by the Everett Public Schools.
 
F. Grades 7 and 8 Summer School
Policy for Potential Repeaters (failing two or more subjects)
If it appears that a student in Grade 7 or 8 is failing English Language/Arts or Mathematics and may not be promoted, a letter will be sent to the student’s parent in May to schedule a meeting to discuss the student’s grades.
 
If the student’s grades do not improve and it appears in June that the student still is failing English/Language Arts or Mathematics and will not be promoted, a second letter will be sent to the student’s parent, and a meeting will be held to discuss the student’s participation in summer school.
 
G. Advancement/Referral
A student who is not promoted may be advanced to the next grade level.
 
Any student who, at midyear, presents a substantial risk of non-promotion (i.e., is failing in two or more major subjects), or who fails to be promoted at the end of the year, or who has been suspended for more than five (5) school days in any quarter, or who has been absent without medical excuse for more than fifteen (15) school days in any quarter, has the right to be referred by a parent to the Director of Special Education for an evaluation.

Absences/Tardiness

The Everett Public Schools recognizes the importance of regular attendance as a factor in successful academic achievement. Consistent participation in school and school-related activities is important for making a successful transition from youth to adulthood. Massachusetts law requires that every minor child, between the ages of six (6) and sixteen (16), attend school. Every student is expected to be in school whenever school is in session.

 

Student tardiness and truancy frequently are behavioral indicators that a student is experiencing stress or other difficulties in his or her life. Parents are legally responsible for ensuring that a child under their control attends school daily. It is unlawful for anyone to willfully induce or attempt to induce a minor to miss school, and to employ or to harbor a minor who should be in school.

 

The reasons accepted by the Everett Public Schools to excuse a student’s absence from school are the following:

• Personal illness: Generally, absences due to illness are not excused absences. A doctor’s note is recommended after five (5) consecutive days of absence. In order to re-enter school after five days absence, a student must be accompanied by a parent and, if no doctor’s note is provided, must be seen by the school nurse.
• Death in the family
• Family emergency
• Emergency medical and dental appointments. Parents should schedule routine appointments for after-school and weekends
• Mandated court appearances, as victim or witness
• Observance of religious holidays
• Emergency or another legitimate circumstance that makes attendance at school impossible
 
A written note, signed by the parent, is required in all instances of absence.
 
Students will be provided with an opportunity to make up work missed during their absences, but students are responsible for making up the missed work. Students must make up work on the teacher’s make up night or during some other pre-arranged time. If students fail to make up the required work, teachers have no alternative but to record zeroes for the work assigned on days of absence. If a student’s absence is expected to be of unusual duration, the student’s parent should notify the school office, and the possibility of home instruction will be considered.
 
The parent of a student will be notified by the school, in the following events:
• A student has at least five (5) days in which he or she has two (2) or more periods of unexcused absence in a school year.
• A student has five (5) or more days of unexcused absence in a school year.
 
The Principal will make an effort to meet with the parent of a student who has five (5) or more unexcused absences to develop action steps to encourage student attendance.
 
Preschool and Kindergarten
The Everett Public Schools provides an optional preschool program to qualified residents and a Kindergarten program. Because Massachusetts law does not require these programs, they are offered as a privilege. Preschool and kindergarten students must follow all attendance requirements as those for elementary school students (see below).
 
Elementary Schools (Grades 1-5)
Attendance: When a child must be absent from school, a parent must telephone the school before 8:00 a.m., or the parent may telephone and leave a message at the Main Office. If the school is not informed, there is no way to determine if a child has left home and has not arrived at the proper destination. The school system will make an effort to telephone home to follow-up on any student whose parent has not telephoned. Parents should telephone or make an appointment to visit with their child’s guidance counselor if there are any problems or situations of which the school should be aware.
 
Students who are chronically absent are subject to the following procedures:
• After five (5) absences, a discipline hearing will be called to include the parents, the student, and the Principal or his/her designee.
• After ten (10) absences, another discipline hearing will be called with the same individuals. The Everett Public Schools will consider legal action against the student’s parents. • The Supervisor of Attendance may be involved.
• After fifteen (15) absences, the Everett Public Schools will consider legal action against the parents. This may involve the Department of Children and Families and/or the court.
• Students who have more than twenty (20) absences during a school year may be required to repeat their current grade or to attend summer school at the expense of their parents.
 
Tardiness: All students must be in class and ready for work at the start of school each day. Tardiness is unacceptable. Student punctuality in Pre-school through Grade 5 will be monitored on a regular basis, and tardiness will not be permitted. In Grades 6 through 8, the fourth instance of tardiness and each subsequent instances of unexcused tardiness will result in the student being required to attend administrative detention. In the event that a student is habitually tardy, further administrative action will take place, including but not limited to a meeting with the student’s parents, the Guidance Counselor and the Attendance Officer.
 
Elementary Schools (Grades 6-8)
Attendance: Students who are absent for MORE THAN FIVE (5) DAYS in the quarter will receive a grade of FA (failure due to absences) for that quarter. Students who receive a grade of FA, but are otherwise passing, will be given an average of 59. If a child is failing both academically and due to absences, the failing grade will remain as the grade for the quarter. Similarly, students who are absent for MORE THAN THIRTY-FIVE (35) DAYS in the school year, but are otherwise passing, will receive a grade of FA (59%) as the final grade. Extenuating circumstances may be considered when presented to the administration on the day of return from an absence.
 
If a student receives a grade of FA in any of the first three quarters of a school year, but in the very next quarter improves his/her attendance and passes the course that quarter, the student’s grade from the previous quarter will be changed back to his/her original academic grade.
 
Any student who is failing due to excessive absences, even if the student otherwise would be passing academically, may be excluded from participating in end-of-year activities and will be considered for retention.

 

If a student’s absences exceed thirty-five (35) days for the school year, he/she will not be allowed to attend summer school to make up coursework, and, therefore, will not be promoted to the next grade level.
 
Extenuating circumstances may be considered when presented to the administration on the day of the return.
A. Clarification of “Excused” Absence Policy                     
Absences are excused for the following reasons:
• Death in the family
• Mandated court appearance as either a victim or a witness
• Observance of religious holidays
• An emergency, which makes attendance at school absolutely impossible
 
b. Generally, medical reasons are not excused absences unless supported by a note from the treating physician.
The first day of consecutive absences is never excused.
If a student is absent for two or more consecutive days this may be considered by the principal as one incident and therefore as an absence of one day. All work must be made up to the satisfaction of  the individual teachers involved.

 

Students are entirely responsible for making up work missed during their absences. Students must make up work on the teacher’s make up night or during some other pre-arranged time. If students fail   to make up the required work, teachers have no alternative but to record zeroes for the work assigned on the days of absence.

 

Eligibility to Participate in School Activities

Students must be in attendance all day to be eligible to participate in school activities on that same day or night.  The Principal or designee must approve all exceptions.

 

A. Dismissals
No student shall be dismissed during school hours without a written request from his or her parent, stating the reason and the time for dismissal. A student who is to be dismissed from school should go to the main office before 7:50 a.m. to present a written request for dismissal. No student in Pre-K through Grade 8 will be dismissed without parent or duly authorized designee physically appearing, with proper identification, for the child at the Principal’s office. The student will not be dismissed until the parent or designee arrives at the office to meet the student. NO STUDENT WILL BE DISMISSED BY TELEPHONE. In case of accident or illness during school hours, no student shall be dismissed without receiving permission from the Principal’s office.
 
In the event that a student will need to be dismissed from school early, parents are asked to notify and make arrangements with their children before they leave for school that day. This will help the school to reduce classroom interruptions and the unnecessary use of school telephones during the course of the instructional school day.
 
Excessive tardiness and excessive dismissals negatively impact student achievement. Students who arrive at school late or who are dismissed from school early will be marked absent from the classes that are missed. These absences will count toward the total number of absences for that student. The Principal, in consultation with the Superintendent, may retain a student or assign the student failing academic grades due to an excessive number of tardies and/or early dismissals.
 
B. Vacation Policy
Family vacations should be scheduled to coincide with school vacations. Educationally, students cannot afford to miss school for an additional vacation. Each day, students are involved in lessons requiring high levels of thinking skills and problem solving skills. Schools are expected to meet high standards of academic achievement. Schools are unable to provide students with the necessary education that meets the requirements of state and federal mandates if students are not present. School attendance, therefore, is a crucial part of a child’s education. Any absence due to a vacation, other than during a scheduled school vacation period, is an unexcused absence.

 

Frequent absences, tardiness, and/or truancies will result in a parent conference and may lead to disciplinary action. If excessive or illegal absences continue, the Attendance Supervisor may take the case to court with the recommendation of the Principal.

 

For students enrolled in Kindergarten through Grade 8, the student may be required to attend summer school or to repeat the grade, if he or she is absent from school more than twenty (20) days during a school year.

 

C. Communications from Parents Regarding Absences

Parents should make every reasonable effort to communicate with the school when a child is absent by calling the school before 8:00 a.m., the start of the school day. The following information should be provided:

• The name of the person calling and relationship to the student;
• The student’s name, address, grade and room number.
 
The telephone numbers for reporting absences are as follows:
Adams: 617-544-6092
English: 617-394-5013
Keverian: 617-394-5020
Lafayette: 617-394-2450
Parlin: 617-394-2480
Webster: 617-394-5040
Webster Extension: 617-544-6990
Whittier: 617-394-2410
 
On the day that a student returns to school after having been absent, the student’s parent must send a written note, signed by the parent, stating the date and reason for the absence. Written notes are required for all student absences, tardiness and dismissals. The schools shall retain all notes and consider them integral to student records.
 
D. Enforcement of Attendance Policy
The Everett Public Schools employs a Supervisor of Attendance. The Supervisor has the lawful power to apprehend and take to school any minor child who is truant and to investigate all cases where a child in the public schools fails to attend school.
 
A petition, known as “CRA petition” (Child Requiring Assistance), may be filed by the school district if a minor child persistently and willfully fails to attend school. The court has the authority to remove the child from the parents and to place the child into the custody of the state Department of Children and Families. A report known as a “51A report” may be filed against parents on behalf of any child for educational neglect if a child is not attending school on a regular basis.
A.  Shelter in Place/Lockdown
A Shelter in Place is a safety practice that takes place when a situation that may be dangerous occurs near the school, somewhere in our community. There is no immediate threat to our students, but it is safer for students to remain indoors and for the school to restrict the comings and goings of everyone. During this procedure, no one is allowed in or out of the school. If you are a parent and arrive at the school while a shelter in place is in effect, you will not be allowed into the school until the Shelter in Place has ended.
 
A Lockdown, is a more significant event, means that there is an immediate threat; there is a problem inside the school. During a lockdown, classroom doors are locked and students must remain with their teachers and follow instructions. If you are a parent, and arrive at the school while a lockdown is in effect, you will not be allowed in or near the school until the lockdown has ended. You will be directed to a place away from the school where information will be made available to you. Information that is available will be posted on our website www.everettpublicschools.org.
 
B. Fire Drills
The fire drill procedure has been established by the Everett Public Schools and endorsed by the local fire department. The children are taught fire drill procedures at the beginning of the school year, after which time they practice frequently. Fire drills are held at least once a month, weather permitting. Specific instructions and evacuation routes are posted on the wall in each classroom.
 
C. Safety Coming to and Going from School
• The school teaches children how to proceed with maximum safety to and from school. Pupils are taught the following:
• To cross the street under safe conditions;
• Never to run from behind parked cars;
• To use the safest or prescribed places to cross the street;
• To look in both directions before crossing the street;
• To walk on the sidewalk in an orderly manner to and from school;
• To enter, occupy, and leave transportation with consideration for the rights and safety of others, as well as themselves
• Never to ask for or to accept rides from strangers.
• As a means of preventing trouble and providing protection to your child to and from school, we also strive to teach the following:
• Their parents, teachers, and the police wish to keep children safe and happy.

• The police officer is a friend of the children, and the child is to go to the police at any time that he or she is in trouble.


D.  Crossing Guards
Crossing Guards will be at their assigned positions from 7:30 a.m. to 8:30 a.m. and 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Additionally, they will be at the Adams School and Webster School from 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. for preschool sessions.

 

E. Before School Supervision
Parents should not send children to school too early. Students should arrive at school as close to 7:45 a.m. as possible. This is especially true during cold or inclement weather. There is no playground supervision prior to the opening of school at 7:45 a.m.

 

F. Playground Parking

All vehicles should be out of the schoolyard before 6:30 a.m. No vehicles may enter or leave the schoolyard between 6:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

 

G. Insurance Options

Information concerning student accident insurance is distributed at the beginning of the school year. There are two policies available: one offering limited coverage during the school day, and one offering twenty-four hour, fifty-two week protection. These insurance forms are to be mailed back directly to the insurance company with your payment.

 

H. Field Trips
Field Trips are held at the discretion of the Principal. Transportation is arranged by the school office and paid for by students or the Parent Teacher Organization within each school.

The following types of field trips are not allowed:

• Out of state trips, unless specifically approved by the School Committee;
• Overnight trips, unless specifically approved by the School Committee;
• Trips to amusement parks;
• Trips to locations where swimming will occur, unless specifically approved by the School Committee; and
• Trips without parent permission.

 

 

Students who participate in any extracurricular athletic activities and become unconscious, suffer a concussion, or are suspected of having suffered a concussion may not return to the competition or practice where the injury occurred. Such student must see his or her primary physician and will need to be given clearance by the physician in order to return to competition or practice and engage in any extracurricular athletic activities. Our guidance, like that of the Centers for Disease Control’s “Heads Up: Concussion in Youth Sports” initiative, is: “Keep the athlete out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experience in evaluating for concussion, says the athlete is symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.” A complete copy of the Concussion Policy is available in the Superintendent’s office.
A Federal Protection of Pupil Rights Amendment (PPRA)
Under federal law, parents and eligible students (those who have reached the age of eighteen (18)) have the following rights with respect to the conduct of surveys, collection and use of information for marketing purposes, and certain physical examinations:
• Schools must obtain their consent before students are required to participate in a survey that concerns one or more of the following protected areas (“protected information survey”) if the survey is funded in whole or in part by a program of the United States Department of Education:
1. Political affiliations or beliefs of the student or student’s parent;
2. Mental or psychological problems of the student or student’s family;
3. Sexual behavior or attitudes;
4. Illegal, anti-social, self-incriminating, or demeaning behavior;
5. Critical appraisals of others with whom respondents have close family relationships;
6. Legally recognized privileged relationships, such as with lawyers, doctors or ministers;
7. Religious practices, affiliations, or beliefs of the student or parents;
8. Income, other than as required by law to determine program eligibility.
 
• Parents and eligible students must receive notice of, and be allowed to opt out of, the following activities:
1. Any other protected information survey, regardless of funding
2. Any non-emergency, invasive physical exam or screening required as a condition of attendance, administered by the school or its agent, and not necessary to protect the      immediate health and safety of a student, except for hearing, vision or scoliosis screening,  or any physical exam or screening permitted or required under state law
Activities involving the collection, disclosure, or use of personal information obtained from students for marketing, or to sell or otherwise distribute the information to others
 
• Upon request, parents and eligible students have the right to inspect the following before administration or use:
1. Information surveys of students
2. Instruments used to collect personal information from students for any of the above marketing, sales or other distribution purposes
3. Instructional material used as part of the educational curriculum
 
B. Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act
Under the federal Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act (AHERA), schools are required to determine the presence of asbestos-containing building materials in all school buildings. Accredited inspectors must visually inspect all school buildings, and bulk samples of suspected materials must be taken, where the material was not assumed to be asbestos. The law further requires that an Asbestos Management Plan be created for each individual building, providing for the means and methods to deal effectively with asbestos-containing building materials. All phases of asbestos inspection and management planning are reported in these plans, including response action strategy, priorities, scheduling of abatement activities, and coordination of personnel and evaluation of results.
 
The Everett Public Schools recently completed the required three-year re-inspection and the six-month inspection. The AHERA management plans for each school building are complete, and copies are kept on file in the Maintenance Office. If you would like to review the AHERA management plans, please contact Mr. Charles Obremski, Assistant Superintendent of Schools for Business Affairs, at 617-394-2400.
 
C. Pest Management Control Policy
Under state law, schools are required to implement pest management strategies that minimize the risks to children from exposure to pesticides in school settings. Among other things, the law limits the types of pesticides that may be used on the outdoor grounds of any school. Your child’s Principal will present and review an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) plan to your School Council and Parent Teacher Organization. The IPM plan also is available in the Principal’s office for your review.
 
The law also requires that schools send standard written notification home to parents and employees at least two (2) working days before an outdoor pesticide application is to take place. If a school official determines that a human health emergency warrants the use of a pesticide not otherwise allowed or sooner than two (2) days after providing the required standard written notification, the official may apply for a single-use waiver from the Board of Health before applying the pesticide under Massachusetts General Laws chapter 132B, section 6H, and must post conspicuous notices regarding the use of the pesticide for at least seventy-two (72) hours after its application.
The Everett Public Schools is committed to maintaining an educational environment and work place where bigotry and intolerance, including discrimination on the basis of race, color, national origin, homelessness, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, religious beliefs, disability or age are not tolerated, and where any form of intimidation, threat, coercion and/or harassment that insults the dignity of others and interferes with their freedom to learn or work is unacceptable. The Everett Public Schools is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer.
 
The Everett Public Schools takes allegations of discrimination and harassment seriously and will respond promptly to complaints. Where it is determined that inappropriate conduct has occurred, the Everett Public Schools will act promptly to eliminate the conduct and will impose remedial and corrective action as necessary, including appropriate disciplinary action, which may include school-related discipline for students or termination of employment for employees. Retaliation against individuals who file or participate in the investigation and resolution of complaints of discrimination or harassment also is prohibited.
 
Below is a summary of a number of important federal and state civil rights and educational opportunity statutes:
A. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 prohibits discrimination based on race, color or national origin in programs or activities receiving federal financial assistance. Students covered by this statute may not be excluded from participation in programs or activities that receive federal financial assistance on account of their membership in a protected category. The statute has been interpreted to protect students whose native language is not English and who have limited English language proficiency. Examples of discrimination prohibited by Title VI include racial harassment, school segregation, and the denial of language services to language minority students. This statute is enforced by the Office for Civil Rights in the United States Department of Education.
B. Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits discrimination based on sex in education programs and activities that receive federal financial assistance. Under this statute, the School Committee must adopt and publish a policy prohibiting sex discrimination and must establish a grievance procedure to address complaints of sex discrimination by students. Examples of the types of discrimination that are prohibited by Title IX include sexual harassment, the failure to provide equal opportunity to girls and boys in athletics, and discrimination based on sexual orientation and pregnancy.
C. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals on the basis of their disabilities. Otherwise qualified disabled individuals, including parents and students, may not be excluded from participation in any program or activity receiving financial assistance. Federal regulations implementing this statute provide that school districts must provide disabled students with a free and appropriate education. The school district has designated a coordinator who is responsible for, among other things, investigating and resolving complaints of discrimination or non-compliance with the statute.
D. Equal Educational Opportunities Act of 1974 prohibits discrimination based on national origin and requires schools to take appropriate action to overcome language barriers that impede equal participation by its students in their instructional programs. Under this statute, the school district is required to identify and provide services for students with limited English proficiencies (LEP or ELL students).
E. Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, like Section 504, prohibits discrimination against otherwise qualified individuals on the basis of their disabilities. The school district has designated a coordinator who is responsible for, among other things, investigating and resolving complaints of discrimination or non-compliance with the statute. An individual is protected by this statute if he or she has a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, OR has a record of such an impairment, OR is regarded as having such an impairment, OR has a record of an IEP on file with the school district. Under this statute and Section 504, a student with AIDS/HIV infection has the same right to attend classes and to participate in school programs and activities as any other student.
F. McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act is designed to ensure that homeless students have the same access as other children to public education, including public preschool programs. Homeless students are those who lack a “fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence, including children who share the house of other persons or live in motels, hotels or shelters due to loss of housing, economic hardship, or similar conditions, live in cars or similar settings that are not meant for regular sleeping accommodations, have been “thrown out” of their families’ homes, or have run away and are not in the physical custody of a parent or guardian. Homeless students have the right to remain in their school of origin or to attend school where they are temporarily residing. Everett Public Schools will make school placement determinations on the basis of the “best interest” of the homeless child or youth based on student-centered factors. Students who choose to remain in their school of origin have the right to remain there until the end of the school year in which they obtain permanent housing. Students who choose to enroll in a school where they are temporarily residing must be enrolled immediately, even if they do not bring records usually required for enrollment with them. Homeless students also may be entitled to transportation to and from school and transportation will be arranged as appropriate so as not to create barriers to homeless students’ attendance, retention and success. Homeless students and youth are entitled to access academic and extracurricular activities.
G. Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 76, Section 5, also known as Chapter 622, prohibits discrimination based on race, color, sex, religion, national origin, sexual orientation and gender identity in the admission to public schools and in obtaining the advantages, privileges and courses of study in such schools. The regulations implementing this law require schools to establish policies and procedures, provide training and implement and monitor practices to ensure that obstacles to equal access to school programs are removed for all students, including transgender and gender nonconforming students.
 
If you have any questions regarding Title VI or Title IX, or wish to file a complaint alleging unlawful discrimination, harassment or retaliation in violation of these laws, please contact the Director of Human Resources, Title VI/Title IX Coordinator.
 
If you have any questions regarding Section 504 or the Americans with Disabilities Act, please contact Ms. Kathleen McCormack, the Director of Guidance, Section 504 Coordinator at 617-394-2492.
 
If you have any questions about the McKinney Vento law, homeless children and youth, unaccompanied minors, or foster children and youth, please contact the District’s Local Liaison, Mr. Charles F. Obremski, Assistant Superintendent of Business Affairs, at 617-394-2400.

 

Additionally, students may choose to report such concerns to a teacher, the Principal, the Assistant Principal, a Guidance Counselor, the Director of Special Education or the Superintendent of Schools. Complaints may be filed verbally or in writing. Teachers or other staff members who observe incidents of discrimination or harassment involving students should report such incidents immediately to the Principal, Assistant Principal, or a Guidance Counselor. School staff members who are aware of discrimination or harassment involving another employee should report such matter to the Director of Human resources and/or the Building Principal.
A. In accordance with G.L. c. 269, §17, hazing is prohibited in the Everett Public Schools. Such conduct also is against the law and is punishable by fine and/or imprisonment.

 

B. The term “hazing” means any conduct or method of initiation into any student organization, whether on public or private property, which willfully or recklessly endangers the physical or mental health of any student or other person. Such conduct includes whipping, beating, branding, forced calisthenics, exposure to the weather, forced consumption of any food, liquor, beverage, drug or other substance, or any other brutal treatment or forced physical activity that is likely to adversely affect the physical health or safety of any such student or other person, or that subjects such student or other person to extreme mental stress. It also includes extended deprivation of sleep or rest or extended isolation. Consent is not available as a defense to any prosecution for hazing under state law.

 

C. Under G.L. c. 269, §18, anyone who knows that another person is the victim of hazing and/or is at the scene where hazing takes place is required to report the crime, to the extent that such person can do so without danger or peril to himself or others, to an appropriate law enforcement official as soon as reasonably practical. Whoever fails to report such a crime will be punished by a fine of not more than one thousand dollars.

The Everett Public Schools refuses to tolerate and prohibits teen dating violence under any circumstances. Retaliation against any person who reports teen dating violence, provides information during an investigation into allegations of teen dating violence, witnesses instances of teen dating violence or has reliable information about a teen dating violence incident also is strictly prohibited. A student who knowingly makes a false accusation of teen dating violence or retaliation shall be subject to disciplinary action.

 

In furtherance of its commitment to prevent and stop teen dating violence, the Everett School Committee has adopted the following Policy on Teen Dating Violence.  

The Everett Public Schools defines Domestic and Dating Violence in accordance with the Abuse Prevention Act, Massachusetts General Law 209A: Abuse is defined as 1) causing or attempting to cause physical harm; 2) placing another in fear of imminent serious harm; 3) causing another to engage involuntarily in sexual relations by force, threat or duress. Massachusetts General Laws Chapter 209A

Goal

The Everett Public Schools is committed to providing equal educational opportunities for all students. All schools are expected to promote an atmosphere of safety, respect and caring for all students, school officials, employees, consultants, contractors and visitors, and to provide an atmosphere that is conducive to teaching and learning.

 

The Everett Public Schools refuses to tolerate and prohibits teen dating violence under any circumstances. Retaliation against any person who reports teen dating violence, provides information during an investigation into allegations of teen dating violence, witnesses instances of teen dating violence or has reliable information about a teen dating violence incident also is strictly prohibited. A student who knowingly makes a false accusation of teen dating violence or retaliation shall be subject to disciplinary action.

 

General Statement of Policy

This policy is designed to prevent and stop negative behavior patterns of teen dating violence. The Everett Public Schools Policy on Teen Dating Violence proposes an integrated approach which incorporates preventive education, behavior management, disciplinary action, and restorative justice. The balanced approach addresses the needs of the victim, the perpetrator and community through processes that preserve the safety and dignity of all.

 

Application

The Teen Dating Policy shall apply to all students in the Everett Public Schools.

Teen dating violence is prohibited on school grounds, property adjacent to school grounds, at a school-sponsored activity, function or program whether on or off school grounds, on a school bus, or through the use of technology or an electronic device owned, leased or used by a school district or school.   Teen dating violence is prohibited at a location, activity, function or program that is not school related or through the use of technology or an electronic device that is not owned, leased or used by a school district or school. If the violence creates a hostile environment at school for the victim, infringes on rights of the victim at school or materially and substantially disrupts the education process or the orderly operation of the school, disciplinary action may be taken.

 

Factors which affect whether a dating relationship is substantive depend upon the length of the relationship, the frequency of interaction, and the length of time since the end of the relationship, if applicable. Abusive teen dating relationships generally exhibit a pattern. The United States Department of Justice defines teen dating violence as “the perpetration or threat of an act of violence by at least one member of an unmarried couple to the other member within the context of dating or courtship.” Young women, including lesbians often hide dating violence because they are inexperienced in dating, do not want to tell parents, have romantic views of love, and are pressured by peers to have relationships. The female often thinks that the boyfriend’s jealousy, possessiveness, and abuse are romantic. The male in the relationship feels he has the right to control and possess the female partner.   At that time, an adolescent may think that possessive jealousy and controlling behavior is loving devotion. Some common clues that a teenager is in an abusive relationship are physical signs of injury, truancy, falling grades, use of drugs and alcohol, and changes in mood.  

 

Typically, the teen victim is isolated from his/her peers because of the controlling behavior of his/her partner. Because of the violence, a teen may have difficulty acquiring new and mature relationships with peers of both sexes. The teen will often have difficulty gaining emotional and social independence because of the violence.   The ongoing violence may even deter the ability of the teen to develop personal values and beliefs.  

Behaviors Not Allowed

Verbal/Non-verbal/Written Behaviors

1. Use of put-downs, insults, name-calling, swearing, or offensive language.
2. Screaming or yelling at one another
3. Making threats, being intimidating, or getting friends to threaten and/or scare someone
4. Use of the internet for the above mentioned behaviors

5. Consequences: verbal warning, possible suspension, parent notified, possible counseling referral

 

Physical Behaviors

1. Hitting, punching, pinching, pushing, grabbing, shoving, slapping, kicking, choking, pulling hair, biting, throwing things, arm twisting, etc
2. Intimidating, blocking exits, punching walls, knocking things around
3. Damaging or destroying another’s property
4. Restraining, pinning someone to the wall, blocking their movements

Consequences: as conduct rules apply, administrators informed, parental contact, police contact, if necessary, possible schedule changes, possible diversion program and/or counseling referral

 

Sexual Behaviors

1. Name calling such as bitch, slut, fag, etc
2. Cat calls or other offensive noises or whistling
3. Spreading sexual gossip
4. Comments about a person’s body or unwanted verbal or written comments
5. Staring or leering with sexual overtones or sexual gestures

Consequences: as conduct rules apply, parental contact, counseling referral

 

Other Behaviors

1. Use of weapons
2. Stalking
3. Forcing obscene materials on others
4. Pulling off or lifting clothes to expose private parts
5. Rape or attempted rape
6. Inappropriate photographs/sexting 

Consequences: as conduct rules apply, parental contact, police contact, counseling referral

The purpose of education is to foster knowledge, to encourage the development of young minds and to enhance the potential of the total student. Therefore, there is no place in an educational setting for behavior that distract from learning. An important part of your child's education is learning how to get along with other people. Good discipline is a part of quality education. The teachers and administration of the school will encourage and emphasize mutual respect at all times. A sound code of discipline also teaches values. The following code of discipline is designed to inform you and your child or what is and is not acceptable behavior. Parents play a very important role in helping the schools to implement this code of discipline. Please take adequate time to review this code of discipline with your child.
 
A.  Parent Responsibilities
• Parents should be involved in a "parent partnership" with the school and the school’s support teams.
• Parents should feel free to confer with teachers at prearranged times on matters involving their child's school performance and behavior.
• Parents are expected to attend all scheduled conferences.
• Parents are expected to encourage their child to be a good citizen and to use good manners at school as well as at home.
• Parents are expected to see that their child arrives at school properly groomed and dressed and on time.
• Parents are expected to see that their child completes all homework assignments.
• Parents are expected to instruct their child on safety procedures to and from school.
 
B.  Parent-Teacher Conferences
Teachers acknowledge the need for regular parent-teacher communication. Parents will be notified prior to report card periods regarding the performance of their child by way of progress reports. In addition, conferences to discuss a child's progress may be initiated by teachers, administrators or parents. There also will be regularly scheduled parent-teacher conferences. These conferences are opportunities for parents and teachers to discuss a student’s academic performance and behavior.
 
C. Student Responsibilities
• Students are expected to respect the school staff, to show consideration for others and to use good manners.
• Students are expected to show good citizenship towards their school and community.
• Students are expected to attend school, and to arrive properly groomed and dressed and on time.
• Students are expected to complete all classroom and home assignments.
• Students are expected to follow school rules in school, while traveling to and from school, and during off-site school-sponsored, school-related and extracurricular activities.
• Students are expected to try their best to achieve.
 
Students are responsible for all textbooks, library books and other school supplies issued to them. Students are expected to keep such items in good shape and to return them to the school at the end of the school year. If books or supplies are lost or are not returned in good shape, students will be responsible for the cost of replacing them.
 
D.  Student Attendance and Student Absences
Massachusetts law requires that every child between the ages of six (6) and sixteen (16) attend school. Students are expected to attend school regularly. Kindergarten also is an integral part of a student’s education. Students should attend all sessions unless they are ill.
 
Frequent absences, tardiness, and/or truancies will result in a parent conference and may lead to disciplinary action. If excessive or illegal absences continue, the Attendance Supervisor may take the case to court with the recommendation of the Principal.
 
Students may not leave school before the end of the school day unless they have a written request from their parents, stating the reason and time for dismissal, and their parent or other authorized person physically calls for them at the Principal’s office. In the case of an accident or illness requiring a student’s dismissal during school hours, the student will not be permitted to leave school without receiving permission from the school office.
 
E. Student Tardiness
Students will be considered tardy if they have not reported to their homeroom when the last bell rings. If a student is provided by the school district with transportation and the transportation is late, he or she will not be considered tardy.
 
F.  Student Dress Code
Students, at all times, should attend school in attire that is neat, clean and modest. Clothing, buttons, costumes and other apparel that are reasonably likely to cause disruption or disorder within the school are forbidden. Clothing that is hazardous to the health and safety of the student or others also is prohibited.
 
Students, therefore, should not wear items picturing or referencing violence, weapons, messages or images that are sexually explicit or suggestive, lewd, vulgar, obscene or discriminatory. Students are not allowed to wear hats or head-covers in the building, jewelry that might endanger student safety, gang attire or other items that are intended to intimidate others (i.e., bullying).
 
In general, any type of clothing or apparel that is determined by the Principal or his/her designee to be disruptive to the educational process or the general operations of the school is prohibited. Parents will be notified of repeated violations of the Student Dress Code.
 
The following are examples of the types of clothing that students should not wear in school:
• Sleeveless shirts with the shoulder and/or undergarments showing, including but not limited to: Tank tops, tube tops, and sleeveless tees/undershirts
• Low-cut blouses, half/three-quarter length shirts, or other clothing that reveals skin of mid-section of body. Rule of thumb: when arms are lifted in the air, bellybutton should not be seen.
• See-through clothing with undergarments showing.
• Shorts or skirts shorter than fingertips when arms are hanging by side.
• Low-slung pants, pajamas, hospital-style clothing. Pants should be worn at the waist or high enough so that no undergarments or bare skin is visible.
• Skateboards, razor scooters, rollerblades and shoes with shoes with wheels on soles.
• Bare feet, tongs, slippers.
• Coats, jackets, hoods, masks, etc. Once in the building, all coats, jackets, and other similar outer garments must be put in the locker.
• Hats are not to be worn while in the building, but may be in one’s possession when entering school and when leaving school.  The following items are allowed: Headbands and hair wraps no wider than 3½ inches – to manage hair only; and head coverings worn as a reasonable accommodation to a student’s sincerely held religious beliefs.
• Spiked apparel or accessories.
• Chains of more than six inches, when hung from the waist.
• Clothing or paraphernalia that may be considered to be gang-related
• Bandanas of any kind, including those hanging from the pocket, waistband, etc.
 
G. Other Items That May Not be Used in School
The following items may not be used in school during the school day by a student:
Electronic audio equipment and video devices, including but not limited to the following: Cell Phones, Laser Pointers, Cameras, iPods, MP3Players, Selfie Sticks.

 

If these items are brought to school for use before or after the school day, they must be turned off and stored out of sight throughout the school day. If not stored or if used improperly, they will be taken from the student.

 

The first time any electronic equipment or device is taken from the student, a warning will be issued and the item will be held until the end of the school day. Additionally, there will be a phone call home to alert the parent of the infraction, and the infraction will be entered into the student’s discipline record.

 

The second and any subsequent time that any electronic equipment or device is taken from a student, the parent must come to school to retrieve the item, and the student will be subject to further disciplinary action.

 

The school district does not assume responsibility for any such items that are lost, stolen or damaged while in school or when confiscated.

 

If a student continues to violate the above rules, he or she will be subject to detention, in-school suspension or external suspension.
 
H.   Academic Responsibilities
All students are expected to meet the required academic standards. While academic efforts are generally reflected in our grading process and other evaluations, flagrant disregard of academic responsibilities in all subjects, including classroom assignments and homework, may result in disciplinary action, including but not limited to detention. Additionally, the student’s parents will be notified. A student who engages in cheating, plagiarism or forgery will be subject to a parent/guardian conference and disciplinary action. See the school district’s Plagiarism Statement.
 

EVERETT PUBLIC SCHOOLS’ STATEMENT ON PLAGIARISM

As members of the Everett Public Schools community, we expect the highest standards from ourselves and from each other. Dishonorable behavior diminishes us, and those who ignore such behavior are, in fact, giving approval by their silence. Acting responsibly often requires making difficult choices.

 

The Everett Public Schools is a place where each of us can learn and grow; where honor is valued in all aspects of our lives. Honesty is, therefore, a fundamental expectation of our schools. In addition, cooperation, responsibility and independence by each member of the school community will ensure continued success.

 

With academic honesty at the center, a “social contract” among teachers, students and parents places responsibilities on each. Teachers must prepare thoughtful and purposeful assignments, which include a clear definition of the appropriateness or inappropriateness of sharing work and information. Students must follow these guidelines, and parents must reinforce them. Part of the message parental message must be a clear statement that a poor grade honestly earned is preferable to a good grade dishonestly earned.

 

The message that honesty is valued and expected must be sent clearly, not only by teacher and parents, but also by the entire community. The schools are at the center of a democratic government. An educated citizenry is a necessary condition for success. True education can only take place in an atmosphere of academic honesty.
 
I.  Lockers/Desks
Students will be assigned desks and individual lockers whenever possible. Desks and lockers belong to the school and are intended to be used by students only to store books, school supplies, lunches, hats and outdoor clothing. Students are prohibited from placing in desks or lockers any weapons, drugs, drug paraphernalia, alcoholic beverages, tobacco products, stolen property or any other items of no reasonable use to a student in school.
 
Students may not use lockers other than their assigned locker. Students should not write on lockers or place any stickers or tape on lockers. Having a locker is a privilege, not a right. Students who violate school rules relative to lockers may lose this privilege.  Students should have no expectation of privacy in their lockers or desks.
 
School officials reserve the right to conduct periodic announced and unannounced inspections of desks and lockers. School officials also may search a student’s desk or locker if there is reasonable suspicion to believe that the desk or locker contains contraband or the search will reveal evidence of a violation of the rules of the school or the law. All items suspected of being contraband will be removed from the desk or locker and secured in the Principal’s office, unless the removal presents a danger to others.

 

Any personal items left in students’ desks and lockers will be disposed of by the school district at the end of the school year. The Everett Public Schools assumes no responsibility for the loss, theft or damage to any property stored in a student’s desk or locker.
 
J. Student Searches
School officials may search a student or his or her possessions in school, on school grounds or at a school-related event, if, at the time of the search, there is reasonable suspicion to believe that the search will reveal evidence that the student has violated or is violating either the rules of the school or the law.
 
K.  Behavior
Appropriate student behavior is expected at all times, including in school, on school grounds, while traveling to and from school and at school related activities.
 
The school administration also may apply and enforce school rules and policies against students in connection with conduct occurring before and after school hours and off school grounds, including while traveling to and from school and during off-site school-sponsored, school-related and extracurricular activities. See Nicholas B. v. School Committee of Worcester, 412 Mass. 20; 587 N.E.2d 211 (1991) (A school committee lawfully may discipline a student for misconduct occurring after school and off school grounds where such misconduct was the continuation of improper behavior that commenced during the schools day on school grounds).

 

Whenever unacceptable student behavior occurs, the student may become subject to restrictions on his or her right to attend school and his or her privileges, including attendance at school-sponsored, school-related and extracurricular activities.
 
The following list contains examples of unacceptable student behaviors that may result in discipline:
• Breaking classroom rules set by the teacher
• Breaking playground or cafeteria rules
• Refusing to follow directions or requests made by school personnel
• Violating the school district’s policy on bullying*
• Fighting or threatening to harm another person
• Pushing, shoving, running in lines or hallways
• Excessive talking or interrupting class activities
• Displaying rude or improper manners
• Chewing gum, or eating candy or food outside of a scheduled meal or snack period
• Using vulgar, profane or abrasive language, including ethnic, racial, religious or gender-based slurs
• Making a false alarm or bomb threat
• Using the internet or computer inappropriately
• Possessing contraband (any item that is prohibited or is of no reasonable use to a student in school)
 
This list does not exhaust all possible areas of misbehavior. A further list of unacceptable behavior, also non-exhaustive, is included below in the section on grounds for suspension.

 

If a student behaves in a way that is considered inappropriate, he or she will receive a penalty that is in keeping with the student’s actions, age, intelligence and experience. The Principal will interpret the rules and regulations and will extend their applications in a manner consistent with their intent. Every effort will be made to balance fairness and the need to teach appropriate behavior with consistency in the application of this Code.

To provide for the orderly functioning of our schools, it is necessary to have certain rules and regulations that must be adhered to for the good of the entire student body. Discipline policies provide for the safe and orderly functioning of a school. These policies contain rules and regulations that state what behavior is expected and allowed within the school community, set consequences for breaking the rules, and establish procedures for enforcing the rules and regulations. In addition, these policies are intended to help students understand their behavior, solve problems, and develop positive strategies for managing daily life and for being a productive member of the school community. To the extent deemed feasible by the administration, consistent with the school’s obligation to provide an environment that is safe and supportive for all students, non-exclusionary disciplinary approaches will be tried before a student is removed from class or school.

 

When it is necessary for a student to be suspended or expelled, the student nonetheless will be granted the opportunity to receive education services to make academic progress during the period of suspension or expulsion.

 

Thus, any student who is serving an in-school suspension, short-term suspension, long-term suspension or expulsion is entitled to the opportunity to make up assignments, tests, papers and other school work and to earn credits as needed to make academic progress during period of removal from classroom or school. Further, any student who is suspended for more than ten (10) consecutive days, whether in school or out of school, or is expelled, shall have opportunity to receive education services and to make academic progress toward meeting the state and local requirements through a school-wide education service plan.

 

The discipline policies for the Everett elementary schools apply to any student whose conduct at any time or place, interferes with or obstructs the mission or operations of the schools or the safety or the welfare of students or employees, including but not limited to while in attendance at school, on school property, traveling to or from school, or at any school-related activity.
 
A. Grounds for Discipline
The following list of unacceptable behaviors constitute grounds for disciplinary consequences, which may include, but are not limited to, in-school suspension, short- or long-term suspension. This list is general in nature and does not cover every possible infraction that may result in discipline. Students may be subject to discipline, including removal from school, if they engage in any other conduct that is considered to be detrimental to the school or constitutes a breach of good conduct for students.
• Arson
• Assaulting, hitting, shoving, pushing, tackling or fighting with another person
• Being present in a part of a school building or its grounds that is off limits to students and refusing to leave, when requested
• Being excessively tardy
Violating the school district’s policy on bullying
• Cutting class or cutting school
• Destroying, defacing or vandalizing property belonging to the school or another person
• Disrupting school or classroom activities
• Forging a staff member’s or parent’s signature
• Gambling
• Hazing
• Harassment based on race, color, religion, national origin, age, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation or disability
• Inappropriate use of the internet, computer or other school-owned or leased electronic equipment or device; intentional destruction or disruption of computer files
• Insubordination
• Leaving the school building, school grounds or established recess boundaries without permission
• Loitering in or around the school building
• Making false fire alarms or bomb threats
• Plagiarism or cheating
• Possessing, selling, distributing, using, or being under the influence of alcohol or any prescribed or non-prescribed controlled substance
• Possessing, threatening to use or using a weapon, an instrument giving the appearance of a weapon or any other object of no reasonable use to a student in school
• Repeated violation of the student dress code
• Refusing to identify oneself to school staff, when requested, or providing false identification
• Refusing to obey a direct command by school staff
• Smoking or using any tobacco products; possessing matches, lighters, electronic cigarettes or hookahs
• Stealing or engaging in extortion
• Threatening bodily harm to another person or to the school community
• Throwing snowballs, ice or other objects
• Using profane and/or obscene language or ethnic slurs
• Engaging in conduct that constitutes grounds for suspension or expulsion under G.L. c. 71, §37H or §37H½
 
Plagiarism or cheating (i.e., submitting the work of another person as one's own or copying from another student’s test or assignment) will result in the student receiving a failing mark on that assignment and a parent conference, as well as disciplinary action.
 
Forgery (i.e., falsifying parent’s signature on school work or school documents) will result in a parent conference, as well as disciplinary action.
 
Violation of the school district’s technology policies may result in denial of computer or internet usage in school, as well as disciplinary action.

 

Conduct that violates the law may be reported to the appropriate law enforcement officials and may result in court action, as well as disciplinary action.
 
B. Disciplinary Options
Students who fail to comply with the behavioral expectations described in this Code of Conduct may be subject to disciplinary action deemed appropriate by the administration. The Principal or other person acting as a decision-maker must exercise discretion in deciding the consequences for the offense, consider ways to reengage the student in the learning process, and consider and, if appropriate, try non-exclusionary alternatives before removing a student from class or school.
 
The following are some of the options that will be considered and may be used:
1.   Student-Teacher Conferences
A student-teacher discussion of the problem may provide the student with an awareness of why his or her conduct is inappropriate, alert the teacher to the student’s individual needs, and create an opportunity for the student and the teacher to work out a satisfactory solution. The classroom teacher, whether it be the homeroom teacher or specialist, is primarily responsible for supervising students and promoting a positive approach whenever possible.
2.  Parent-Teacher Conferences
Parents are encouraged to get to know their child's teachers early in the school year in order to promote a positive rapport. If a teacher does contact a parent, it is essential that the parent respond as soon as possible so that any issue is confronted promptly. Only through a cooperative effort by parents and staff can solutions be developed and implemented that will improve student behavior and academic performance.
3.  Parent-Counselor and Student-Counselor Conferences
While communications concerning a child’s daily performance, homework or other parental concerns should be directed first to the classroom teacher, Guidance Counselors can provide parents with current information on student progress, up-coming activities and availability of teachers’ for parent meetings. Guidance counselors also provide a valuable service by being available to meet with students either individually or in small groups. Students are encouraged to contact their Guidance Counselor when any issue arises that distracts them from concentrating on their studies.
4.  Parent-Administrator Conferences
Teaching time is valuable, and distractions from learning in the classroom must not be tolerated. Thus, on occasion, an administrator will contact a parent to request participation in a meeting to resolve these issues. These meetings usually are scheduled when a teacher feels that assistance is needed because a student is encountering continual discipline problems or is not providing the effort required in his or her schoolwork.
5. Detention
Students may be detained after school under the supervision of a professional employee if the student has had an excessive number of incomplete homework assignments, disciplinary issues, and any other issues at the discretion of the Principal. All students detained will be given the opportunity to contact their parents in advance. Parents are responsible for providing their child’s means of transportation home in the event that their child is detained. After-school detention for students in Kindergarten through Grade 8 is held from 2:15 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.

6. Schedule Adjustment

After notice to the parent and student giving the reasons for the proposed schedule adjustment, the Principal may decide to alter a student’s schedule to minimize contact between the student and another student, where there is evidence of an ongoing conflict between the two students.

7. Other Alternatives to Removal from Class or School

School staff will consider and utilize, as they deem appropriate, disciplinary alternatives that minimize a student’s removal from class or school and that teach students appropriate behavior while holding them accountable for their behavior. Such alternatives may include exclusion from extracurricular, athletic or other school-sponsored activities or events; re-teaching of expectations and skills; training on topics such as bullying, social skills, appropriate behavior, conflict resolution and anger management, restorative justice, behavioral contracts, mediation, written apology, reflective essay or activity or referral to community-based services. In certain circumstances, however, a student’s behavior may warrant immediate removal from class or school.

8. Alternative Academic Environment (In-School Suspension) Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾

Alternative Academic Environment is the temporary removal of a student from regularly scheduled classes and school activities and the placement of the student during the school day in a supervised area within the building. A student may be placed in an Alternative Academic Environment for up to ten (10) consecutive school days during the course of a school year for a single infraction, or for up to ten (10) cumulative school days during the course of a school year for multiple infractions. Placement of a student in an Alternative Academic Environment for ten (10) consecutive or cumulative days is not considered to be a short-term suspension. Placement in an Alternative Academic Environment for more than ten (10) consecutive or cumulative days is considered to be a long-term suspension, and the procedures applicable to long-term suspensions must be followed.
 
Before a student may be placed in an Alternative Academic Environment, a Principal or designee will:
• Inform the student of the disciplinary offense with which he or she is charged and the basis for the charge;
• Provide the student with an opportunity to dispute the charge and/or to explain the circumstances surrounding alleged incident;
• Determine whether the student committed the offense as charged; and
• If so, inform the student of the length of the in-school suspension, which shall not exceed ten (10) days, cumulatively or consecutively, in a school year.
 
On the same day that the in-school suspension is imposed, the Principal or designee will make reasonable efforts to notify the student’s parent orally of the disciplinary offense, the reasons for the determination that the student committed the offense, and the length of the in-school suspension. The Principal or designee will invite the parent to a meeting on the same day, if possible, to discuss the student, the student's academic performance, strategies for student engagement and possible responses to the student's behavior.

 

Also on the day of the in-school suspension, the Principal or designee will send a written notice to the student and the student’s parent by hand-delivery, certified mail, first-class mail or email to the address provided by the parent, or by any other method of delivery agreed to by the Principal and the parent.
 
The notice must include the following:
• The reason for and length of the in-school suspension; and
• An invitation to the parent to meet to discuss the student’s academic performance and behavior, strategies for engaging the student and possible responses to the student’s behavior, if such meeting has not already occurred.

 

While a student is in an Alternative Academic Environment, he or she will be given subject assignments during the school day. If the work assigned is not finished, the student then will have a day of absence counted and possible external suspension will be explored.

 

The removal of a student from extracurricular activities, including athletics, or school-sponsored events, is not considered to be a placement in an Alternative Academic Environment.
 
The parent of a student who is placed in an Alternative Academic Environment for a second time will be required to meet with the student’s teacher, Guidance Counselor and the Principal to discuss the student’s academic performance and behavior, strategies for engaging the student and possible responses to the student’s behavior. At the Principal’s discretion, this conference may be held by telephone.
 
C. Emergency Removal Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾
Emergency removal is the temporary removal of student who is charged with a disciplinary offense from school, school grounds and school-related activities for up to two (2) school days following the day of the temporary removal.
Emergency removal is permitted under the following circumstances:
• The student is charged with a disciplinary offense; and
• The student’s continued presence in school poses a danger to persons or property, or materially and substantially disrupts the order of the school, and, in the Principal's judgment, no alternative is available to alleviate the danger or disruption.
 
The Principal will make adequate provisions for the student's safety and transportation before removing the student from school.
 
In case of an emergency removal, the Principal will:
• Provide immediate written notice to the Superintendent of the student’s removal and reason for the removal, describing the danger presented by the student;
• Make immediate and reasonable efforts to provide oral notice to the student’s parent of the student’s removal, the reason for the removal and the notice requirements for short-term or long-term suspension, as may be contemplated by the Principal;
• Provide written notice to the student and the student’s parent, consistent with the notice requirements for short-term or long-term suspensions, as applicable;
• Before the expiration of the emergency removal, unless the time is extended by agreement with the student and the student’s parent:
            - Provide the student with a short-term or long-term suspension hearing, as applicable;
            - Provide the parent with an opportunity to attend the hearing;
            - Render a decision orally on day of the hearing; and
            - Provide a written decision for a short-term or long-term suspension, as applicable, no later than the school day following the hearing.
 
If the hearing demonstrates that the emergency removal was warranted, and the need for a continued suspension exists, then the suspension may be extended up to the limits provided for in the disciplinary rules relating to the particular offense. Time spent out of school during the emergency removal will count toward any additional suspension imposed after the hearing.
 
D. Short-Term External Suspension Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾
Short-term suspension is the removal of a student who has committed a disciplinary infraction from school, school grounds and school-related activities for up to ten (10) consecutive school days. 
 
Except in the case of an emergency, a student for whom a short-term suspension is contemplated is entitled to the following procedural protections before the suspension is imposed:
Notice
• The Principal will notify the student of the proposed action, and will make reasonable efforts to notify the parent orally of the proposed action and the right to attend a pre-suspension hearing.
• The Principal also will send the parent a written notice of the contemplated suspension, in English and the primary language of the home if other than English, or by other means of communication where appropriate.
• The notice will contain the following information in plain language:
- The disciplinary offense with which the student is charged;
- The basis for charge (i.e., evidence against the student);
- The potential consequences, including the potential length of suspension that the student is facing;
- A statement that the student has the opportunity to have the Principal conduct a hearing concerning the proposed suspension at which the student may dispute the charges and/or explain the incident;
- The right to have a parent attend the hearing;
- The date, time and location of hearing; and
- The right of the student and/or parent to an interpreter, if needed to participate in hearing.
• The notice will be sent to the parent by hand delivery, first-class mail, certified mail, or email to the address provided by the parent, or any other method of delivery agreed to by the Principal and parent.
• If the parent does not appear for the hearing, the Principal may proceed without the parent, provided that the Principal has sent the parent written notice of the hearing and has documented at least two (2) attempts to contact the parent in the manner specified for emergency notification.
 
Hearing
The following persons will be present during the hearing: the Principal, the student, the parent (if the parent chooses to attend) and other persons determined by the Principal.
• The Principal will state the charge, determine that the student understands the charge, and discuss and consider the nature of the disciplinary offense, the basis for the charge and any other pertinent information.
• The student will be given the opportunity to dispute the charge, to explain the circumstances surrounding the incident, and to present mitigating factors for consideration by the Principal in determining the consequences.

The parent, if present, will be given the opportunity to discuss the student’s conduct and to offer other information including mitigating factors, for consideration by the Principal in determining the consequences.

• A parent may waive the right to attend a suspension hearing. Such waiver must be in writing.
 
Disciplinary Decision
• The Principal will determine, based on the available information, including mitigating circumstances –
- Whether the student committed offense, as charged; and
- If so, what remedy or consequences will be imposed.
• Before imposing a short-term suspension, the Principal will consider and, where appropriate, try alternatives to exclusion from school.
• The Principal, in his or her discretion, may determine that a short-term suspension will be served in school.
 
Notice of Disciplinary Decision:
• The Principal will notify the student and the student’s parent, in writing, of –
- The disciplinary decision;
- The reason(s) for the decision;
- If suspension is imposed, the type and duration of the suspension; and
- The opportunity for the student to make up assignments and such other school work as needed to make academic progress during the period of the suspension.
• For students in Preschool to Grade 3, before a student is suspended, the Principal must notify the Superintendent in writing of the decision to impose an external suspension, and the reasons for such suspension.
 
The placement of a student in an Alternative Academic Environment, and/or the removal of a student from extracurricular activities or school-sponsored events, is not considered to be a short-term suspension.

 

On the day that the student is scheduled to return to school following a suspension, a parent must appear with the student in the Principal's office. The Guidance Counselor and/or Principal's designee also will participate in the reentry session.
 
E. Long-Term External Suspension (Exclusion) Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾
A long-term suspension or exclusion is the removal of a student from school, school grounds and school-related activities for more than ten (10) consecutive school days, or for more than ten (10) cumulative school days in any school year. Unless imposed under G.L. c. 71, §37H or G.L. c. 71, §37H ½, a long-term suspension may not exceed ninety (90) school days in a school year, and may not extend beyond the end of the school year in which the suspension is imposed.
 
Notice
If a student may be given a long-term suspension, the Principal will provide the student and the student’s parent with the notice applicable to short-term suspensions, and, in addition, will include the following information:
• A description of the due process rights for long-term suspension hearings (see below); and
• Notice of the student’s right to appeal the Principal's suspension decision to the Superintendent.
 
Hearing
In addition to the rights available for short-term suspensions, students facing long-term suspension are entitled to the following:
• An opportunity before the hearing to review the student’s record and documents on which the Principal may rely;
• The right to be represented by counsel or a lay person of the student’s choice, at the student’s expense;
• The right to present witnesses and the student’s explanation of the alleged incident, but the student may not be compelled to do so. A victim or student witness need not be summoned (a) if the Principal rules, orally or in writing, that the identification or presence of the victim or student witness would endanger his or her physical safety or cause intimidation, in which case, the victim or student witness will be allowed to submit a signed written statement or recorded testimony to the Principal; or (b) a criminal case is pending and the District Attorney's office requests that the student victim not testify; or (c) a victim or witness who will not be present at the hearing has submitted a written statement, the student will have an opportunity to review the statement (with the name redacted) at the hearing;
• The right to cross-examine witnesses presented by the school.
The right to request that the hearing be recorded and to receive a copy of the audio-recording, in which case all hearing participants will be notified of the recording.
 
The student’s parent, if present, will be given the opportunity to discuss the student’s conduct and to offer other information including mitigating factors, for consideration by the Principal in determining the disciplinary consequences.
 
Disciplinary Decision
The Principal will determine, based on the evidence:
• Whether the student committed the offense, as charged; and
• If so, after considering mitigating circumstances and alternatives to suspension, what remedy or consequences will be imposed in place of or in addition to long-term suspension.
 
Before imposing a long-term suspension, the Principal will consider and, where appropriate, try alternatives to exclusion from school.

 

The Principal, in his or her discretion, may determine that a long-term suspension will be served in school.
 
Notice of Disciplinary Decision
• The Principal will send the student and the student’s parent written notice of the disciplinary decision by hand-delivery, certified mail, first-class mail or email to the address provided by the parent or by any other method of delivery agreed to by the Principal and the parent, in English and in the primary language of the home, or by other means of communication where appropriate.
• The disciplinary decision will include the following:
- The date of the hearing;
- The participants at the hearing;
- The disciplinary offense with which the student is charged;
- Key facts presented at the hearing;
- Conclusions reached by the Principal based on the evidence;
- The length and effective date of the suspension, as well as the date on which the student may return to school;
- Notice of the student's opportunity to receive education services to make academic progress during the period of the suspension, with information concerning the available options and appropriate school contact person; and
- Information concerning the student’s right to appeal to the Superintendent or designee and the appeal process, including notice that:
• The student or parent must file a written appeal with the Superintendent within five (5) calendar days of the effective date of the long-term suspension;
• The student or parent may request that the Superintendent extend the time to file a written appeal for up to seven (7) additional calendar days, provided that the request is made within five (5) calendar days of the effective date of the long-term suspension; and• The long-term suspension will remain in effect unless and until the Superintendent decides to reverse the Principal's determination on appeal.

• For students in Preschool to Grade 3, before a student is suspended, the Principal must notify the Superintendent in writing of the decision to impose an external suspension, and the reasons for such suspension.
 
The removal of a student from extracurricular activities or school-sponsored events is not considered to be a long-term suspension.
 
Before the student is readmitted to school, the student’s parent will be expected to attend a conference with the Principal or designee, at which time the parent will be informed of any conditions that may be imposed on the student’s reentry. At the Principal’s discretion, this conference may be held by telephone.
 
F. Appeal of Long-Term Suspension to Superintendent Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾
Long-term suspension decisions may be appealed to the Superintendent; short-term suspension decisions may not be appealed. The student or the student’s parent must notify the Superintendent in writing of a request for an appeal not later than five (5) calendar days following the effective date of the suspension; provided, that a student or parent may request, and if requested will be granted an extension of up to seven (7) calendar days.  If an appeal is not timely filed, the Superintendent may deny it or, in his or her discretion, for good cause shown, may allow it to go forward.
 
The appeal hearing will be held within three (3) school days of the Superintendent’s receipt of the notice of appeal, unless the student or the student’s parent requests an extension of up to seven (7) additional calendar days, in which case one such extension will be granted.

The Superintendent will make a good faith effort to include the student’s parent in the appeal hearing. The Superintendent is presumed to have made a good faith effort to include the parent, if the Superintendent has attempted to find a day and time that would enable the parent and the Superintendent to participate in the appeal hearing.

The Superintendent will notify the parent of the date, time and location of the appeal hearing. The notice will be in writing, in English and in the primary language of the home, or by other means of communication where appropriate, and will be sent by hand-delivery, certified mail, first-class mail or email to the address provided by the parent or by any other method of delivery agreed to by the Superintendent and the parent.

 

If the Superintendent is unable to find a day and time that would enable the parent to participate, or the parent does not appear for the appeal hearing, the Superintendent may proceed without the parent.

G. Appeal Hearing Before Superintendent Under G.L. c. 71, §37H¾
The purpose of the appeal hearing is to enable the Superintendent to determine:
• Whether the student committed the disciplinary offense as charged; and
• If so, what the consequence will be.
 
The following procedures will apply to appeal hearings before the Superintendent:
• The student will have all of the rights applicable to a long-term suspension hearing before the Principal.
• The Superintendent may make an audio-recording of the hearing, and will provide a copy to the student or the student’s parent, upon request.
 
The Superintendent will issue a written decision within five (5) calendar days of the hearing. The written decision will include all of the information that is required of the Principal’s initial determination on the long-term suspension. The Superintendent may impose the same or a lesser consequence than imposed by the Principal, but may not impose a greater consequence. The Superintendent’s decision is the final decision of the school district.
 
H.  Suspension and Expulsion Under G.L. c. 71, §§37H and 37H½
Under G.L. c. 71, §37H or G.L. c. 71, §37H½, a Principal may suspend a student for more than ninety (90) days in a school year or may expel a student. Expulsion is the permanent removal of a student from school, school grounds and school-related activities.

 

Any student who is suspended or expelled under G.L. c. 71, §37H or G.L. c. 71, §37H½ will be notified at the time of the suspension or expulsion of the opportunity to receive education services and make academic progress while suspended or expelled, with information concerning the available options and appropriate school contact person.
 
Grounds for Suspension or Expulsion
A Principal may suspend or expel a student under G.L. c. 71, §37H in the following circumstances:
• The student is found on school premises or at a school-sponsored or school-related event, including an athletic game, in possession of a dangerous weapon;*
* The Everett School Department defines the term “dangerous weapon” to include any object or combination of objects that is capable of causing serious injury to persons; is a replica or reasonable facsimile of such an object, and is of no reasonable use to a student in school; or is used as a weapon or to intimidate another individual, such as a bottle, can, scissors, razor, hatpin, metal nail file, baseball bat, hockey stick or other athletic equipment, umbrella, fireworks or explosives, and spray paint, mace or other aerosol or chemical sprays.
• The student is found on school premises or at a school-sponsored or school-related event, including an athletic game, in possession of a controlled substance as defined in G.L. c. 94C, including, but not limited to, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin.
• The student assaults a Principal, Assistant Principal, teacher, teacher's aide or paraprofessional, or other educational staff on school premises or at a school-sponsored or school-related event, including an athletic game.
 
A Principal may suspend a student under G.L. c. 71, §37H½ in the following instances:
• The student has been charged with a felony or felony delinquency, and the Principal determines that the student’s presence in school would have a substantial detrimental effect on the general welfare of the school.

 

A Principal may expel a student under G.L. c. 71, §37H½ in the following instances:

• The student has been convicted of a felony or there has been an adjudication or admission in court of guilt with respect to a felony or felony delinquency charge, and the Principal determines that the student’s presence in school would have a substantial detrimental effect on the general welfare of the school.
 
Hearing Procedures
In the event of a suspension or expulsion under G.L. c. 71, §37H or G.L. c. 71, §37H½, the following procedures will apply:
• The Principal or designee may suspend the student for an initial period of ten (10) days following an informal hearing at which the student is informed of the disciplinary offense with which he or she is charged and the basis for the charge, and is provided with an opportunity to dispute the charge and/or explain the circumstances surrounding the alleged incident.

 

• The student and parent will be given written notice of a formal hearing before the Principal, at which the student may be represented by counsel, at the student’s own expense, and may present and examine witnesses and documentary evidence. The hearing will be recorded and, upon request, the student and parent may obtain a copy of the audio-recording. In determining whether to suspend or expel a student, the Principal will consider all of the relevant information. The Principal will notify the student and parent of his or her decision in writing.
 
I. Appeal of Suspension to Superintendent Under G.L. c. 71, §§37H and 37H½
G.L. c. 71, § 37H: Any student who has been expelled under G.L. c. 71, §37H may appeal the expulsion to the Superintendent. The student has ten (10) calendar days from the effective date of the expulsion in which to notify the Superintendent in writing of his or her appeal. The Superintendent will hold an appeal hearing, at which the student has the right to be represented by counsel, at the student’s own expense. The subject matter of the appeal shall not be limited solely to a factual determination of whether the student has violated any provisions of this statute.
 
G.L. c. 71, §37H½: Any student who has been suspended or expelled under G.L. c. 71, §37H½ may appeal the suspension or expulsion to the Superintendent. The student has five (5) calendar days from the effective date of the suspension or expulsion to notify the Superintendent in writing of his or her appeal. The Superintendent will hold a hearing with the student and the student’s parent within three (3) calendar days of the student’s request for an appeal, unless the time is extended by agreement of the parties. At the hearing, the student will have the right to present oral and written testimony on his or her behalf, and will have the right to be represented by counsel, at the student’s own expense. The Superintendent may uphold, overturn or alter the Principal’s decision, or may recommend an alternate educational program for the student. The Superintendent will render a decision on the appeal within five (5) calendar days of the hearing. The Superintendent’s decision is the final decision of the school district with regard to the suspension or expulsion; no appeal to the School Committee is available.

Pending the outcome of any appeal, the disciplinary decision of the Principal will remain in effect.

If an expelled student applies for admission to another school or school district, the superintendent of that school district may request a written statement of the reasons for the student’s expulsion, and the Superintendent of the Everett Public Schools must provide the other superintendent with such information.
 
J. Availability and Notice of Education Opportunities and Services to Students Who are Suspended or Expelled
The Principal of each school will ensure that students who are removed from class or school have the opportunity during the period of removal to make up assignments, including but not limited to homework, quizzes, exams, papers, projects and other school work, as needed, in order to earn credits and make academic progress.
 
The Principal will ensure that there is a school-wide education services plan in place so that students who are suspended or expelled have the opportunity to receive education services and make academic progress during the term of their suspension or expulsion.

The Principal will notify the parent and student of the opportunity to receive education services at the time the student is placed on a long-term suspension or expelled. The notice shall be provided in English and in the primary language of the student's home if other than English, or other means of communication where appropriate. The notice shall include a list of the specific education services that are available to the student and contact information for a school district staff member who can provide more detailed information.

 

If the student is a special education student, the student’s IEP Team will meet and determine the appropriate educational services for the student during any long term suspension or explusion.

In general, all students are expected to meet the requirements for behavior as set forth in the student handbook and the school’s code of conduct. In accordance with Chapter 71B of the Massachusetts General Laws and with federal law IDEA 2004: Section 615 (k), and with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973: 29 U.S.C. Section 794 (A), the school may suspend or remove your child from his or her current placement for no more than 10 school days. Special provisions are outlined below for students with a documented disability who have an Individualized Education Program (IEP) or a Section 504 Plan.

 

All students are expected to comply with the school district’s disciplinary rules, unless the Individualized Educational Plan (“IEP”) for a special education student specifically indicates that the student is not expected to comply with such rules, or is expected to comply with modified rules. If the student is expected to meet modified rules, such modifications to the behavioral requirements must be described in the student’s IEP.

 

To ensure that the discipline of special education students meets the requirements of federal and state law, Principals must provide prompt written notice to the Special Education Administrator any time such a student commits a suspendable offense.
 
A.   Suspension Procedures
As noted above, a special education student who violates school rules may be suspended for up to ten (10) cumulative days in a school year. If a special education student is suspended for more than ten (10) consecutive school days in a school year, or for shorter periods that constitute a pattern of removal and accumulate to more than ten (10) school days, this is considered to constitute a change in placement.

 

The district may reconvene a special education student’s IEP Team to consider unique circumstances and to give consideration to a change in placement for the student, if he or she has violated the school’s Code of Conduct. Whenever the district contemplates changing a special education student’s placement through the disciplinary process, the district will notify the student’s parent of the procedural protections available to special education students by sending the parent a copy of the Notice of Procedural Safeguard, which may be accessed by visiting the Massachusetts Department of  Elementary and Secondary Education
 
B.   Manifestation Determination
Whenever a suspension would constitute a change in placement for a student, relevant members of the evaluation TEAM, as determined by the school district and the student’s parent, will convene within ten (10) school days of the date of the behavioral incident and determine:
• whether the student’s behavior was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to his/her disability; or
• whether the student’s behavior was the direct result of the school district’s failure to implement the IEP.
 
In making this determination, the TEAM will review all relevant information in the student’s file, including the IEP, staff observations, and any relevant information provided by the parent. If the answer to either of the above questions is “yes,” the student’s behavior is considered to be a manifestation of his or her disability.

 

The TEAM’s determination should be made available to the Principal who is considering the student’s suspension before a disciplinary decision is made. Depending upon the TEAM’s determination, suspension (or expulsion) may or may not be implemented, as explained below.

 

C.   Circumstances When Suspension in Excess of Ten (10) Days May Be Imposed
If the TEAM determines that the behavior is not a manifestation of the student’s disability, the student may be suspended (or expelled), in the same manner and for the same duration as for non-disabled students, in accordance with the procedures set forth in the school district’s disciplinary rules. The school district, however, must continue to provide the student with special education services in a new placement during the term of the suspension (or expulsion).

 

In addition, the student must receive, as appropriate, a functional behavioral assessment and a behavioral intervention plan to address the student’s behavior, so that it does not recur.

 

D. Circumstances When Suspension In Excess Of Ten (10) Days May Not Be Imposed
student may not be suspended for more than ten (10) consecutive days, or ten (10) cumulative days in a school year when a pattern of removal is occurring, if the  TEAM determines that the student’s behavior is a manifestation of his or her disability.

 

In such case, the TEAM must conduct a functional behavioral assessment and implement a behavioral intervention plan. If an assessment already has been conducted and a plan developed, the TEAM must review and modify the plan, as necessary, to address the student’s behavior. Unless the TEAM decides on a new placement for the student as part of the behavioral intervention plan, or the student is eligible for automatic removal by the school district based on the type of offense, the student must be returned to his or her last agreed upon placement.

 

If the parent disagrees with any decision regarding the student’s placement or the TEAM’s manifestation determination decision, the parent may request a hearing before the BSEA. In the event that a hearing is requested, except in limited circumstances discussed below, the student may not be removed from the last agreed upon educational setting (i.e., the placement in effect at the time the dispute arose) unless the parties agree upon another placement, or a court permits the school district to change the student’s placement based on a showing that the student’s continued presence would present a substantial likelihood of injury to the student or to others.

 

E.   Functional Behavioral Assessment
As discussed above, in all cases involving a change in placement that occurs as a result of a disciplinary decision, the student’s TEAM must convene to conduct a functional behavioral assessment for the purpose of developing and implementing interventions to assist the student in avoiding the problematic behavior in the future. If a behavioral intervention plan already exists, the TEAM should review and modify the plan, as necessary, to address the student’s behavior.

 

The student is to be returned to the last agreed upon educational setting (i.e., the placement from which he or she was removed), unless the school district and the parent agree upon another placement as part of the behavioral intervention plan, or the student is eligible for automatic removal by the school district due to the type of offense.

 

F.   Interim Alternative Education Setting
A special education student may be placed in an appropriate interim alternative education setting (IAES) for up to forty-five (45) school days, without parental approval, and without regard to whether the student’s conduct is a manifestation of his or her disability, in the following circumstances:

• The student carried or possessed a “weapon,” as defined under federal law, to or at school, on school premises or at a school function;
• The student knowingly possessed or used, sold or solicited the sale of an illegal drug and/or a controlled substance in school, on school premises or at a school function;
• The student inflicted serious bodily injury on another person (i.e., bodily injury that involves death, extreme physical pain, protracted and obvious disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ or mental faculty) while at school, on school premises or at a school function; or
• A hearing officer in the BSEA determines that maintaining the student in his or her current placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to others.

 

While a student is in an IAES, the school district must continue to provide the student with special education services that enable him or her to continue to participate in the general education curriculum, although in another setting, and to progress towards meeting the goals set out in the IEP.

 

The student’s TEAM also must conduct a functional behavioral assessment and must provide behavioral intervention services and modifications that are designed to address the student’s misconduct so that it does not recur. If an assessment already has been conducted and a plan developed, the TEAM must review and modify the plan, as necessary, to address the student’s behavior.

 

At the end of the forty-five (45) school-day placement, the student will be returned to his or her last agreed upon placement, unless the school district and the parent agree on another placement, or a hearing officer orders another placement.

 

G. Protections for Students Not Yet Eligible for Special Education
Under certain circumstances, students who have not been determined to be eligible for special education services nonetheless may be entitled to the protections described above, if the school had prior knowledge that the student had a disability and was eligible for special education and related services, before the behavior that precipitated the disciplinary action occurred.

 

The school district is deemed to have knowledge that student is a student with a disability if:

• The parent had expressed concern in writing to administrative personnel or the student’s teacher that the student was in need of special education services;
• The parent had requested an evaluation of the student;
• The student’s teacher or other school personnel had expressed specific concerns directly to the Special Education Administrator or other administrative personnel about a pattern of behavior demonstrated by the student.
 
If a parent refused to consent to an evaluation or refused to accept special education services for the student in the past, or the student was determined to be ineligible for special education services in the past, then the student is not protected under this category and may be disciplined in the same manner as non-disabled students.

 

If a parent requests an evaluation for a student after a decision has been made to suspend (or expel) the student, the evaluation must be conducted in an expedited manner. Until the evaluation is completed, the student remains in the educational placement determined by school district.

 

SECTION 504 POLICY
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 prohibits discrimination against an individual with a disability by any program or activity receiving federal financial assistance. If you have any questions regarding Section 504, please contact the Director of Guidance, Ms. Kathleen McCormack, who also serves as the District Section 504 Coordinator, at 617-394-2492.

 

A. Evaluation and Provision of Services for Disabled Students

• Section 504 also requires a school district to provide a free appropriate public education (FAPE) to all students with disabilities in its jurisdictions, regardless of the nature or severity of the student’s disability. In order to fulfill its obligation under Section 504, the Everett Public Schools has a responsibility to identify, assess, and, if a student is determined to be eligible under Section 504, afford access to appropriate education services to students with disabilities.

 

• An appropriate education is defined as regular or special education and related aids and services that are designed to meet the individual needs of students with disabilities as adequately as the needs of non-disabled students are met, and that are developed in accordance with the procedural requirements set forth in the federal regulations relating to educational setting, evaluation and placement, and due process protections. Implementation of an individualized education program (IEP) developed in accordance with the federal and state special education laws is one means of meeting these requirements.

 

• If a student is referred for special education, is found to have a disability, but is not found eligible under the federal and state special education laws, the school may proceed promptly to consider whether the student needs special or regular education and services under Section 504.

 
B. Discipline of Students with Section 504 Plans
• All students with Section 504 Plans are expected to comply with the school district’s disciplinary rules, unless their Section 504 Plan specifically indicates that the student is not expected to comply with such rules, or is expected to comply with modified rules.
 
• Absent a modification of school rules in a Section 504 Plan, a disabled student who violates the disciplinary rules may be suspended for up to ten (10) cumulative school days in a school year, in the same manner as a student in the general education program. “Suspension” is defined as any action that results in the student’s removal from his or her academic program as described in his or her Section 504 Plan, including placement in an Alternative Academic Environment (i.e., in-school suspension), exclusion from transportation services that prohibits the student from participating in his or her prescribed program, and placement in an interim alternative educational setting.
 
• In cases involving the possession of weapons, drugs or serious bodily injury, a student may be removed immediately consistent with the student code of conduct.
 
C. Manifestation Determination
Whenever a suspension would constitute a change in placement for a student with a Section 504 Plan, relevant members of the student’s Section 504 Plan Team, as determined by the school district, will convene within ten (10) school days of the date of the behavioral incident and determine whether the student’s behavior was caused by or had a direct and substantial relationship to his/her disability. The process is called a Manifest Determination. The Section 504 Plan Team must also consider whether the student’s behavior was the direct result of the school district’s failure to implement the Section 504 Plan.
 
In making this determination, the Team will review relevant information in the student’s file, including the Section 504 Plan, discipline reports, staff observations, and any relevant information provided by the parent. If the answer to the question is “yes”, the student’s behavior is considered to be a manifestation of his or her disability. If the Section 504 Plan Team cannot reach consensus on whether a student’s behavior was or was not a manifestation of his or her disability, the Principal will make the determination and provide the parent with written notice.

 

The Section 504 Plan Team’s determination should be made available to the Principal, who is considering the student’s suspension, before a disciplinary decision is made. Depending upon the Section 504 Plan Team’s determination, suspension (or expulsion) may or may not be implemented, as explained below.
 
D.  Circumstances When Suspension in Excess of Ten (10) Days May Be Imposed
If the Section 504 Plan Team determines that the behavior is not a manifestation of the student’s disability, the student may be suspended (or expelled), in the same manner and for the same duration as for non-disabled students, in accordance with the procedures set forth in the school district’s disciplinary rules.
 
E. Circumstances When Suspension In Excess Of Ten (10) Days May Not Be Imposed
A student may not be suspended for more than ten (10) consecutive days in a school year, or ten (10) cumulative days when a pattern of removal is occurring, if the Section 504 Plan Team determines that the student’s behavior is a manifestation of his/her disability.
 
In such case, the Section 504 Plan Team must conduct a Functional Behavioral Assessment and implement a behavioral intervention plan. If an assessment already has been conducted and a plan developed, the Section 504 Plan Team must review and modify the plan, as necessary, to address the student’s behavior. Unless the Section 504 Plan Team decides on a new placement for the student as part of the behavioral intervention plan, or the student is eligible for automatic removal by the school district based on the type of offense, the student must be returned to his/her last academic placement.

If the parent disagrees with any decision regarding the student’s placement or the Section 504 Plan Team’s manifestation determination decision, the parent may request a hearing before the Superintendent or the Bureau of Special Education Appeals (BSEA). In the event that a hearing is requested, the student may not be removed from the last academic setting (i.e., the placement in effect at that time the dispute arose) without the agreement of the student’s parent, unless the student’s continued presence would present a substantial likelihood of injury to the student or to others.
 
F.  Functional Behavioral Assessment
In all cases involving a change in academic placement that occurs as a result of a disciplinary decision, the student’s Section 504 Plan Team must convene to conduct a functional behavioral assessment. The assessment is for the purpose of developing and implementing interventions to assist the student in avoiding the problematic behavior in the future. If a behavioral intervention plan already exists, the Section 504 Plan Team should review and modify the plan, as necessary, to address the student’s behavior.

 

The student is to be returned to the last agreed upon academic setting (i.e., the placement from which he or she was removed), unless the school district and the parent agree upon another placement as part of the behavioral intervention plan, or the student is eligible for automatic removal by the school district due to the type of offense.
 
G.  Interim Alternative Education Setting
A student with a Section 504 Plan may be placed in an appropriate interim alternative education setting (IAES) for up to forty-five (45) school days, without the approval of the parent, and without regard to whether the student’s conduct is a manifestation of his or her disability, in the following circumstances:
• The student carried or possessed a “weapon,” as defined under federal law, to or at school, on school premises or at a school function;
• The student knowingly possessed or used, sold or solicited the sale of an illegal drug and/or a controlled substance in school, on school premises or at a school function; or
• The student inflicted serious bodily injury on another person (i.e., bodily injury that involves death, extreme physical pain, protracted and obvious disfigurement, or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a bodily member, organ or mental faculty) while at school, on school premises or at a school function, or it is believed that that maintaining the student in his/her current academic placement is substantially likely to result in injury to the student or to others.
 
While the student is in the Interim Alternative Education Setting, the school district must continue to provide the student with accommodations that enable him/her to continue to participate in the general education curriculum.
 
At the end of the forty-five (45) school-day placement, the student will be returned to his or her last academic placement, unless the school district and the parent agree on another placement.

 

If a parent requests an evaluation for a student after a decision has been made to suspend (or expel) a student, the evaluation must be conducted in an expedited manner. Until the evaluation is completed, the student remains in the educational placement determined by school district.