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Everett Public Schools High School English Department Honors and AP English Summer Reading & Writing 2018 Grade 9

Everett Public Schools

High School English Department

Honors and AP English Summer Reading & Writing 2018

Copies of these books can be found at our local libraries.

Summer writing assignments can be found on the Everett website.

All writing assignments are due on the first day of school. Points will be deducted from late work.

All summer writing assignments will count toward 10% of the student’s first quarter grade.

Please see rubric attached.

Parlin Library

410 Broadway
Monday-Thursday 9 am – 9pm
Friday 9am – 5pm
Saturday 9am – 1pm

Shute Library
781 Broadway
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9am – 5pm
Tuesday, Thursday 11am – 7pm

 

 

2018 Honors English Summer Reading

Grade 9

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

“Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen  Link:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS: Journal Entries for A Long Way Gone and “Dulce et Decorum Est”

4 journal entries of at least 1 page each (approximately 500 words), explained below

  1. You will write 3 journal entries in response to A Long Way Gone – 1 text-to-self entry, 1 text-to-text entry, and 1 text-to-world entry.
  2. You will write 1 text-to-text journal entry exploring the connections between A Long Way Gone and the poem “Dulce et Decorum Est” by Wilfred Owen.

Dulce et Decorum Est
By Wilfred Owen

Bent double, like old beggars under sacks,
Knock-kneed, coughing like hags, we cursed through sludge,
Till on the haunting flares we turned our backs,
And towards our distant rest began to trudge.
Men marched asleep. Many had lost their boots,
But limped on, blood-shod. All went lame; all blind;
Drunk with fatigue; deaf even to the hoots
Of gas-shells dropping softly behind.

Gas! GAS! Quick, boys!—An ecstasy of fumbling
Fitting the clumsy helmets just in time,
But someone still was yelling out and stumbling
And flound’ring like a man in fire or lime.—
Dim through the misty panes and thick green light,
As under a green sea, I saw him drowning.

In all my dreams before my helpless sight,
He plunges at me, guttering, choking, drowning.

If in some smothering dreams, you too could pace
Behind the wagon that we flung him in,
And watch the white eyes writhing in his face,
His hanging face, like a devil’s sick of sin;
If you could hear, at every jolt, the blood
Come gargling from the froth-corrupted lungs,
Obscene as cancer, bitter as the cud
Of vile, incurable sores on innocent tongues,—
My friend, you would not tell with such high zest
To children ardent for some desperate glory,
The old Lie: Dulce et decorum est
Pro patria mori.

 

Note:
The Latin phrase at the end of the poem is from the Roman poet Horace and means “It is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country.”

 

Text-to-self connections are highly personal connections that a reader makes between a piece of reading material and the reader’s own experiences or life. Some questions you might ask yourself would include:

  • What does this remind me of in my life?
  • What is this similar to in my life?
  • How is this different from my life?
  • Has something like this ever happened to me?
  • How does this relate to my life?
  • What were my feelings when I read this?

Text-to-text. Sometimes when reading, readers are reminded of other things that they have read, other books by the same author, stories from a similar genre, or perhaps on the same topic. These types of connections are text-to-text connections. Readers gain insight during reading by thinking about how the information they are reading connects to other familiar text. “This character has the same problem that I read about in a story last year,” would be an example of a text-to-text connection. Some questions you might ask yourself would include:

  • What does this remind me of in another book I’ve read?
  • How is this text similar to other things I’ve read?
  • How is this different from other books I’ve read?
  • Have I read about something like this before?

Text-to-world connections are the larger connections that a reader brings to a reading situation. We all have ideas about how the world works that goes far beyond our own personal experiences. We learn about things through television, movies, magazines, and newspapers. Often it is the text-to-world connections that teachers are trying to enhance when they teach lessons in science, social studies, and literature. An example of a text-to-world connection would be when a reader says, “I saw a program on television that talked about things described in this article.” Some questions you might ask yourself would include:

  • What does this remind me of in the real world?
  • How is this text similar to things that happen in the real world?
  • How is this different from things that happen in the real world?
  • How did that part relate to the world around me?

 

VOCABULARY

Both the book and the poem contain vocabulary that will be unfamiliar to you. As an aspiring scholar, you must keep a running list of newly acquired vocabulary and definitions, especially in your academic reading. Please keep a dictionary handy. Choose and define at least 10 new-to-you vocabulary words, with the page number where you found it, to bring to class in the fall.

 

Summer Journal Writing Rubric

Criteria

Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Working Toward Expectations Not Meeting Expectations
Text to self
makes connections between text and personal knowledge or experiences
 

Complex, insightful connections to self

 

Meaningful, appropriate, relevant connections to self

 

General, predictable connections to self

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to self

Text to text
makes connections between text and other texts
 

Complex, insightful
connections to other texts

 

Clear, logical, relevant connections to other texts

 

General, predictable connections to other texts

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to other texts

Text to world
makes connections between text and social, historical, political, or other events
 

Complex, insightful connections to world

 

Clear, logical, relevant connections to world

 

General, predictable connections to world

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to world

Evidence
uses evidence to explain the source of the connections and the connections itself
 

Supporting details are rich, interesting, and appropriate for the audience and focus.

Significant, relevant, and specific evidence convincingly supports interpretation.

 

Details are strong but may lack richness and specificity.

Relevant evidence strongly supports interpretation, but may lack significance and specificity.

 

Details are generally relevant and adequate to support focus.

Evidence is generally relevant and adequate to support interpretation.

 

 

Details lack elaboration and may not support the focus or may be missing.

Evidence is not relevant or specific and may not adequately support interpretation.

Journal entries, as defined in the writing assignments, are meant to reflect the student’s ability to make connections from the book to oneself, another text the student has read, and the knowledge of the world that the student has brought to the book. There are no “right answers,” thus there is no need to look at what others have written about the book. Any journal entry that suggests plagiarism or other online short cuts will be scored Not Meeting Expectations.

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