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Everett Public Schools High School English Department Honors and AP English Summer Reading & Writing 2018 Grade 12

Everett Public Schools

High School English Department

Honors and AP English Summer Reading & Writing 2018

Copies of these books can be found at our local libraries.

Summer writing assignments can be found on the Everett website.

All writing assignments are due on the first day of school. Points will be deducted from late work.

All summer writing assignments will count toward 10% of the student’s first quarter grade.

Please see rubric attached.

Parlin Library

410 Broadway
Monday-Thursday 9 am – 9pm
Friday 9am – 5pm
Saturday 9am – 1pm

Shute Library
781 Broadway
Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9am – 5pm
Tuesday, Thursday 11am – 7pm

 

 

2018 Honors English Summer Reading

Grade 12 British and World Lit

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Watch the TED Talk by Adichie called “The Danger of a Single Story” at: link

Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West.

Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with

what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her,

but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WRITING ASSIGNMENTS

Journal Entries for Americanah and “The Danger of a Single Story”

5 journal entries of at least 1 page each (approximately 500 words), explained below

 

  1. You will write 1 journal text-to-self entry, 1 text-to-text entry, and 1 text-to-world journal in response to Americanah (3 total: see below).
  2. You will write 1 journal entry responding to Adichie’s TED Talk, answering the following questions:
    • What single story has someone told (or could someone tell) about you?
    • What is one single story have you held about someone else?
    • What are examples of “single stories” in your education?
    • What are examples of “single stories” in the news?
    • What is Adichie’s call to action at the end of her talk? In other words, what should we do about the problem she identifies?

You will write 1 text-to-text journal entry applying the ideas from Adichie’s TED Talk to Americanah.

Text-to-self connections are highly personal connections that a reader makes between a piece of reading material and the reader’s own experiences or life. Some questions you might ask yourself would include:

  • What does this remind me of in my life?
  • What is this similar to in my life?
  • How is this different from my life?
  • Has something like this ever happened to me?
  • How does this relate to my life?
  • What were my feelings when I read this?

Text-to-text. Sometimes when reading, readers are reminded of other things that they have read, other books by the same author, stories from a similar genre, or perhaps on the same topic. These types of connections are text-to-text connections. Readers gain insight during reading by thinking about how the information they are reading connects to other familiar text. Some questions you might ask yourself would include:

  • What does this remind me of in another book I’ve read?
  • How is this text similar to other things I’ve read?
  • How is this different from other books I’ve read?
  • Have I read about something like this before?

Text-to-world connections are the larger connections that a reader brings to a reading situation. We all have ideas about how the world works that goes far beyond our own personal experiences. We learn about things through television, movies, magazines, and newspapers. We can also learn more about the author’s life, the author’s culture, and the time period in which the author was writing, and this information can help us understand the text better. Research the author’s life, culture, and date of publication or something else that happens in the book (for example, immigration post-9/11) and analyze how those personal, cultural, or worldly events may have influenced her book.

VOCABULARY

This book will contain vocabulary that will be unfamiliar to you. As an aspiring scholar, you must keep a running list of newly acquired vocabulary and definitions, especially in your academic reading. Please keep a dictionary handy. Choose and define at least 10 new-to-you vocabulary words, with the page number where you found it, to bring to class in the fall.

 

Summer Journal Writing Rubric

Criteria

Exceeds Expectations Meets Expectations Working Toward Expectations Not Meeting Expectations
Text to self
makes connections between text and personal knowledge or experiences
 

Complex, insightful connections to self

 

Meaningful, appropriate, relevant connections to self

 

General, predictable connections to self

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to self

Text to text
makes connections between text and other texts
 

Complex, insightful
connections to other texts

 

Clear, logical, relevant connections to other texts

 

General, predictable connections to other texts

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to other texts

Text to world
makes connections between text and social, historical, political, or other events
 

Complex, insightful connections to world

 

Clear, logical, relevant connections to world

 

General, predictable connections to world

 

Superficial, vague, or limited connections to world

Evidence
uses evidence to explain the source of the connections and the connections itself
 

Supporting details are rich, interesting, and appropriate for the audience and focus.

Significant, relevant, and specific evidence convincingly supports interpretation.

 

Details are strong but may lack richness and specificity.

Relevant evidence strongly supports interpretation, but may lack significance and specificity.

 

Details are generally relevant and adequate to support focus.

Evidence is generally relevant and adequate to support interpretation.

 

 

Details lack elaboration and may not support the focus or may be missing.

Evidence is not relevant or specific and may not adequately support interpretation.

Journal entries, as defined in the writing assignments, are meant to reflect the student’s ability to make connections from the book to oneself, another text the student has read, and the knowledge of the world that the student has brought to the book. There are no “right answers,” thus there is no need to look at what others have written about the book. Any journal entry that suggests plagiarism or other online short cuts will be scored Not Meeting Expectations.

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